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Thread: What is a bore, calibre and mm of any Cartridge?

  1. #1
    New Member Wahhajahmad's Avatar
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    What is a bore, calibre and mm of any Cartridge?

    i wish to clarify the difference between a bore of a gun and its caliber ,. and even want to know their definations ,. since i am new and young :P


  2. #2
    Supreme Member HussainAli's Avatar
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    Dear Wahhaj Ahmad Bro, Welcome to PakGuns forum !

    Regards your question; Kindly scroll a bit in intrduction section, you will find your related info.

    Regards
    A stitch in time saves Nine

  3. #3
    Dear Wahhaj Ahmad Bro, Welcome to PakGuns forum !

    check out this link,

    http://answers.yahoo.com/question/in...=1006042607409

  4. #4
    New Member Wahhajahmad's Avatar
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    than you mian jee, your link really helped me in making my concept of the matter


  5. #5
    Lord of War Ch_Adnan's Avatar
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    bore is diameter of bullet's projectile in inches and calier in mm (i think) correct me
    like 7.62*25mm is calber of 30 bor it is 0.30 inches and 7.62 mm projectile and 25mm is lenght of ullet case

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    LISTEN PLEASE
    suppose I have a 7.62/.308 x 51 cartridge
    7.62/.308 is the diameter of the bullet
    51 mm is the chambering of the bullet
    or
    the length of the cartridge case is 51 mm
    25MM = 1 inch
    or
    24 MM = 1 inch (precise)

  7. #7
    Member Extraordinaire Birdshooter007's Avatar
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    Welcome to PG major o.. Whereabouts in Sahiwal? And share your collection with us.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Ali Khan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by major o View Post
    LISTEN PLEASE
    suppose I have a 7.62/.308 x 51 cartridge
    7.62/.308 is the diameter of the bullet
    51 mm is the chambering of the bullet
    or
    the length of the cartridge case is 51 mm
    25MM = 1 inch
    or
    24 MM = 1 inch (precise)
    25.4mm=1 inch (Precise)

  9. #9
    Lord of War Ch_Adnan's Avatar
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    25mm is the lenght of bullet case chahy 1inch ya jitna b bany

  10. #10
    Senior Member Anjum's Avatar
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    I brought a vernier caliper to check and still confused.
    Last edited by Anjum; 08-03-2012 at 09:41 AM.
    ”Slow is Smooth & Smooth is Fast”

  11. #11
    Lord of War Ch_Adnan's Avatar
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    y confused

  12. #12
    Member kf7mjf's Avatar
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    "Caliber" refers to the size of the bore, either in inch measurements (.308) or millimeter measurements (7.62mm) "Bore" is a very British term for the size of the chambering, and can be used interchangeably with "caliber" (Although, being an American, the term isn't used very much here, so it's a bit alien). But ".30 bore" and ".30 Caliber" mean the same thing.

    This article may help you http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caliber

    As others have stated, the full designation for a cartridge may include both the bullet diameter as well as the length of the case (7.62x25mm means a bullet of 7.62mm with a case length of 25mm or 9x19mm is a 9mm bullet in a 19mm long case)

    Measure a case from the top of the case mouth, to the base of the case. Measure a bullet across the bottom of it's base. Rifled bores are measured either from the top of the lands, or from the bottom of the grooves. This is why .303 British bullets, or 7.62mm Russian bullets are really around .310-311, and why 7.62 NATO bullets are in fact 7.62mm. Different ways of measuring the bores.

  13. #13
    Senior Member doc pistol's Avatar
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    kindly elaborate on grains/grams also

  14. #14
    Member Extraordinaire Birdshooter007's Avatar
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    1 gram = 15.4323 grains
    E.g a 150grain bullet = 9.72 grams

  15. #15
    Enthusiast Loser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chauhdary View Post
    1 gram = 15.4323 grains
    E.g a 150grain bullet = 9.72 grams
    Means a 115 grains FMJ bullet = 7.45 grams?
    - the tool which would teach men their own use would be beyond the price - Plato

  16. #16
    Enthusiast TRX's Avatar
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    Originally "bore" was a British term, specifying the number of round lead balls that would fit in the barrel to make a pound. If it took twelve balls to make a pound, the firearm was a "12 bore." It wasn't a very precise system, but it was simple (by British standards, anyway) and adequate for the time. Later, after rifled barrels became popular, manufacturers started referring to the diameter in decimal inches. This was originally the "lands", or high spots in the rifling, and was easily measured. Later, they began using the diameter across the bottom of the rifling, called the "grooves." But since rifling varied in depth depending on the type of the rifling and who was doing the work, the modern method is to ignore the barrel and refer to the bullet diameter. That's why a .303 British bullet is now a .311" diameter... even though it's still the same size. The European method of referring to cartridges is by diameter, length, and rim type. A 7x57 is a rimless 7mm Mauser, a 7x57R is a rimmed 7mm Mauser, for example. This is a very imprecise system, since there can be many different cartridges of the same diameter and length that do not interchange, by case taper, shoulder configuration, or pressure rating. The usual method in the British Commonwealth and USA is to give each cartridge a unique name to specifically identify the cartridge. This sometimes results in things like the .460 Rowland, which has the same bullet diameter as the .45 ACP, which is actually .451, not .45... well, if it was easy anyone could do it. It's also not unusual for a cartridge to have more than one name. A European might refer to a "7.62x63mm" cartridge. He would have a very hard time finding any in the USA, where the manufacturer calls it ".30-06". The US government used to refer to it as the ".30 Army", but now refers to it as "M2", since they have a new .30 caliber cartridge, which they refer to as 7.62x51 to differentiate it from both the .30-06 and the previous .30 Army, now referred to as .30-40 Krag... You know, you could do a TV game show on this sort of thing. "Rajiv, for ten points, what is the more common name for the .276 Rigby?"

  17. #17
    Lord of War Ch_Adnan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loser View Post
    Means a 115 grains FMJ bullet = 7.45 grams?
    yes sir 7.4518739 grams

  18. #18
    Enthusiast Loser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 90 two baretta View Post
    yes sir 7.4518739 grams
    Thank you =)
    - the tool which would teach men their own use would be beyond the price - Plato

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