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Thread: Hunting Rifle Cartridges of the World

  1. #41
    Expert Member masood357's Avatar
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    25-06 Remington

    The 25-06 , originally a wildcat cartridge, was picked up by Remington and added to their commercial line late in 1969. The wildcat version dates back to around 1920, when it was introduced by A. O. Nieder, and Remington has stuck to his original configuration of simply necking-down the 30-06 case. The Remington Model 700 series bolt-action rifles were the first to be offered in the newly-adopted caliber. At the present time, Remington, Interarms, Ruger, Savage, winchester, Weatherby, Sako and almost every other manufacturer of bolt-action rifles offer at least one version in 25-06. In addition, the Ruger single shot is available in this caliber. Since its commercial introduction, the 25-06 Remington has become a very popular number.

    The 25-06 was probably the finest of the 25-caliber wildcats, and its emergence as a standardized factory item has been welcomed by many. As a varmint cartridge it is best with the 87-grain bullet, and for big game one should stick to the 117- or 120-grain bullets. With the former, 4831 and H-870 give top velocity within permissible pressures, and with heavier bullets, 4831 and N205 work best. This cartridge definitely develops top velocity only with slower burning powders. Some consider the 25-06 good for anything from varmint through deer only; others insist it will handle anything in North America. Like most other multipurpose cartridges, satisfactory results depend on using the right bullet for the game and conditions and placing the shot right!

  2. #42
    Expert Member masood357's Avatar
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    257 Weatherby Magnum

    This cartridge was developed by Roy Weatherby about 1944, a year before he actually went into the commercial gun business. Like most of the other Weatherby cartridges, it is based on the necked-down and blown-out 300 H&H case. Commercial ammunition under the Weatherby name has been available since 1948. This has been based on Norma components since about 1951. There are a number of wildcat versions of the 300 H&H Magnum necked-down to 25-caliber, but the Weatherby cartridge has largely displaced these because of the availability of factory ammunition and rifles.

    The 257 WM is one of the first modern, ultra-velocity, small-bore, rifle cartridges to be produced on a commercial basis that developed and retained a large degree of popularity. It is quite accurate and well-suited for long-range varmint shooting on one hand, and delivers sufficient velocity and energy to take on almost any North American big game on the other hand. A superb deer, antelope, sheep, goat or black bear cartridge, it has also been used successfully on elk, moose, brown bear, lion, buffalo and zebra. Many authorities insist that it is much too light for heavy or dangerous game, but high-velocity advocates insist with equal favour that with proper bullets, it is adequate for any thing except the largest and most dangerous game in close cover. In any event, it is not intended as a woods rifle, for the light, high-velocity bullets are too easily deflected. It is in its element for long-range plains or mountain hunting. For long-range varmint shooting it can only be described as 'spectacular".
    Last edited by masood357; 09-12-2011 at 04:43 PM.

  3. #43
    Expert Member masood357's Avatar
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    6.5mm Remington Magnum

    The 6.5mm is a Remington innovation introduced in 1966 for their Model 600 carbine. The 6.5mm Remington Magnum is based on the 350 Remington Magnum case, the only difference being in the caliber reduction. The Remington Model 600 carbine had an 18 1/2-inch barrel and the later 660 carbine a 20-inch barrel. Neither of these carbines allowed the cartridge to develop its full velocity potential and both were discontinued. By 1971, only the Remington Model 700 and 40-XB target rifle with 24-inch barrels were cataloged as available in 6.5mm Magnum caliber. for a short time, the Ruger Model 77 was offered in this caliber. At the present time, no one offers rifles chambered for the 6.5mm Remington Magnum, although Remington still loads the ammunition.

    The 6.5mm Remington Magnum has greater case capacity and develops higher velocity than any of the European 6.5s. It is actually an excellent cartridge for North American big game hunting and can also double as a varmint cartridge by handloading the lighter bullets of 87 to 100 grains. Probably one reason it never achieved great popularity was because of the rifles it was offered in, which were not very appealing designs, and their short magazines required deep seating of the heavier bullets with a consequent loss in powder capacity and performance. Combined with the short barrels of the Remington Model 600 and 660 carbines, this added up to ballistics well below the 30-06 class of cartridges. In a standard action that will allow seating the heavier bullets farther out, one can nearly approach the performance of the 270 Winchester. With the proper bullet, the 6.5mm Magnum is adequate for almost any North American big game at moderate to long ranges under normal hunting conditions. Unfortunately, this is another case of a basically good cartridge that didn't catch on. At one time, Remington offered two bullet weights, a 100-grain bullet at an advertised muzzle velocity of 3450 fps and a 120-grain bullet at 3220 fps. The older 6.5mm cartridges gained their reputation as good killers with the heavier bullets of 140 to 160 grains, and the lack of such a factory load is very likely another reason for the demise of the Remington version. Maximum performance is delivered by 4350, 4831 and H450 powders, in this cartridge, particularly with heavy bullets.

  4. #44
    Expert Member masood357's Avatar
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    264 Winchester Magnum

    This cartridge was officially announced by Winchester in 1958, but production rifles didn't show up until well into 1959. The 264 Magnum is one of a series of cartridges based on the original Winchester 458 belted case, necked-down. It is interesting for several reasons, one of being that it is the first American 6.5mm cartridge since the long-defunct 256 newton was announced back in 1913. It was originally available only in the Winchester bolt-action Model 70 "Westerner" with a 26-inch stainless steel barrel. At present, Winchester offers the standard weight Model 70XTR Magnum with a 24-inch barrel, which means some reduction on the original ballistics. For a time, the Remington 700 Series was offered in 264-caliber.

    The 264 Winchester is a very fine, ultra-velocity cartridge with excellent long-range possibilities and ballistics somewhat superior to the time-tried 270 Winchester. Its development may well have been suggested by the 257 Weatherby Magnum, for the two are quite similar. The 264 should be able to equal anything the 257 WM can do, but with the added advantage of the heavier 140-grain bullet for the larger species of big game. The 100-grain bullet is intended for animals in the deer and antelope class, the 140-grain for elk and above. The rifling twist used by Winchester is not quick enough to stabilize spitzer bullets of more than 140-grains. However round-nosed bullets up to 160-grains have provided satisfactory practical accuracy in many rifles. The handloader has a wide choice of bullets ranging from 87 to 160 grains. All things considered, the 264 Magnum should be adequate for any North American big game, but it is plains and mountain cartridge, not intended for heavy brush or woods hunting. The ballistics listed in the current Winchester catalog show muzzle velocity reduced 380 fps for the 100-grain bullet and 170 fps for the 140-grain. This is probably due as much to reduced loading as it is to the shorter barrel.

  5. #45
    Expert Member masood357's Avatar
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    270 Winchester

    Designed by Winchester for their Model 54 bolt-action rifle and first marketed in 1925, the 270 caused quite a stir in shooting circles. It has remained somewhat controversial ever since. At that time, it offered better long-range potential than any big game cartridge generally available on the American market. It has now been adopted by practically every manufacturer of standard bolt-action high-powered sporting rifles in the world. The Remington slide actions and Remington and Browning semi-autos are also available in 270-caliber. The cartridge is based on the 30-06 case necked-down. It was a long time favorite of well-known gun writer the late Jack O'Connor, who probably contributed more popularizing the 270 than any other individual.

    Along with the 30-06, this is one of the most accurate and effective all-round American big game cartridges. Its reputation and popularity have increased at a steady rate since its introduction. Although not intended as a varmint cartridge, the 270 will serve very well in that capacity when loaded with 100 grains. It is generally conceded to be a better long-range varmint cartridge than its parent, the 30-06. The original 130-grain bullet at over 3100 fps muzzle velocity is considered adequate by many experienced for any North American big game. When first introduced, some deer hunters complained that this bullet had such an explosive effect it ruined too much meat. To satisfy the "need" for a deer load, Winchester brought out a 150-grain bullet at the reduced velocity of 2675 fps. However, it was short-lived because the people who demanded it wouldn't buy it. The present 150-grain bullet at 2900 fps is intended more for maximum penetration on such heavier animals as elk, moose or the big bears. Some disagree, but current evidence forces the conclusion that the 270 is adequate for any North American big game and many African plains animals as well. Assuming the hunter uses the proper bullet weight and type for the job at hand, the 270 will deliver reliable performance. In any comparison of the 270 with the 30-06, much depends on intended use and hunting conditions. For some reason, probably less recoil, many individuals shoot better with the 270 than the 30-06. The 270 is flatter shooting than the 30-06, and thus makes a better varmint/big game rifle where this is a consideration. The 30-06, with its 180, 200 and 220 grain bullets, is conceded a better woods, brush or heavy game caliber. In accuracy and general killing power, there isn't a great deal to argue about. Anyone trying to make a big case for one against the other is beating a pretty dead horse.

  6. #46
    Member Extraordinaire Birdshooter007's Avatar
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    30-06 is the best for Pakistan. The most popular big game cartridge in the world.

  7. #47
    Expert Member masood357's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chauhadry View Post
    30-06 is the best for Pakistan. The most popular big game cartridge in the world.
    Off course Yes, I am compiling this data for informative purpose and these are not my personal views. Regards.

  8. #48
    Expert Member masood357's Avatar
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    280 Remington (7mm Express Remington)

    The 280 Remington was introduced by that company in 1957. Initially it was chambered in the Remington Model 740 autoloader, later in the 760 slide action and the 721 and 725 bolt actions. The 700 series bolt-action rifles by Remington originally included the 280 chambering. From 1979 to 1980, Remington cataloged the 280 as the "7mm Express Remington," but too much confusion resulted and they went back to the original 280 moniker. Most European manufacturers have added to their bolt-action rifle line. The 280 Remington, actually a 7mm with a bullet diameter of .284-inch, is based on the 30-06 case necked-down, and is very similar to the 7mm-06 which has been around for a good many years. In 1979, Remington introduced a new 150-grain loading.

    This is a 30-06 class cartridge of slightly more power than the 270 Winchester, at any rate, it can be loaded to greater power if fired from a bolt action rifle. If used in the autoloader or the slide action, pressures must be kept below 50,000 psi. Factory ammunition is loaded to about 47,000 psi. It would be stretching a point to say that the 280 is better than the 270 Winchester, although it is probably a little more versatile due to the variety of factory bullets available. The 280 is certainly adequate for any North American big game and would also lend itself for use on varmints and the lesser varieties. It is another case of a good wildcat cartridge finally emerging in a commercial version. It has picked up a modest following among 7mm fans since its introduction. The new 150-grain bullet at 2970 fps brings out some of the latent potential of the 7mm/280, which is truly an excellent long-range big game cartridge.

  9. #49
    Lord of War SalmanHusain's Avatar
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    @masood sb!! bohaat ala. lovin ur posts to the last fullstop of it.
    "I'll give you my gun when you pry it from my cold, dead hands!"

  10. #50
    Expert Member masood357's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SalmanHusain View Post
    @masood sb!! bohaat ala. lovin ur posts to the last fullstop of it.
    Thanks a lot Bro ! These appreciative remarks energize me to type more n more of my paper form data for the forum sharing. Regards.

  11. #51
    PakGuns Elite! Avais's Avatar
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    @masood357: Bro thanks for sharing well researched info on various calibers.

  12. #52
    Expert Member masood357's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Avais View Post
    @masood357: Bro thanks for sharing well researched info on various calibers.
    Respected Avais Bhai ! Special thanks to you seniors accepting and appreciating my two cents. Regards.

  13. #53
    Expert Member masood357's Avatar
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    7mm-08 Remington

    Remington introduced this medium capacity rifle round to the marketplace in 1980. It is based on the unmodified 308 Winchester case necked-down to 7mm and loaded with a 140-grain bullet at 2860 fps. Remington advertised this cartridge as the "......first modern 7mm round designed for use in short-action rifles." This is rather interesting claim in view of the fact that the 284 Winchester designed for the same purpose, arrived on the scene in 1963. Furhter more the 7mm-08 is a direct copy of the 7mm/308 wildcat that dates back to at least 1958, probably earlier. This is not meant to denigrate what is a very fine cartridge, but rather to demionstrate that there really isn't much new under the sun despite advertising claims.
    Original rifles chambered for the 7mm-08 were the Remington Model 788 and 700BDL Varmint Special bolt-actions. Current Remignton catalogs list 700 series and Model Seven bolt actions as available in this chambering. Other makers are begining to chamber it; among the early starters were Savage and Alpha. Silhouette shooters of all types also use the 7mm-08 Remington.
    Remington has certainly hung their hat on 7mm caliber and with considerable success. They now offer five chamberings: 7mm-08, 7x57mm Mauser, 7mm Express (280 Remington), 7mm Remington Magnum and 7mm BR for the XP-100 silhouette pistol. However, the 7mm BR originated as something of a semi-wildcat based on the 308x1.5-inch necked-down. Remington has contributed more than any other company to the belated recognition ot the ballistic advantages of the 7mm caliber by U.S. shooters.

    The 7mm-08 140-grain load surpasses the 308 Winchester 150-grain load downrange, according to Remington tests from a 24-inch barrel. Based on Remington ballistic data, this appears to be true, particularly at around 500 yards. At that range, the 7mm bullet has an edge of 238 fps and 750 fpe over the 308 bullet. This would make at least some difference in potential killing power and also help in better bullet placement at unknown distances. This is not sufficient difference to cause owners of 308-caliber rifles to rush down and trade them off for 7mm-08s, but it does illustrate the ballistic advantages of the smaller caliber.
    The 7mm-08 is a great favorite with many metallic silhouette shooters, and many glowing reports have been heard regarding its accuracy on the range, particularly with handloads. It is also building a good reputation as a long-range deer and antelope cartridge. When handloaded with heavier bullets than the factry 140-grain, it would alo be suitable for heavier game such as elk. Unfortunately, the two factory bullet weights do not make for a very flexible big game cartridge unless one is willing to handload. On the other hand. by handloading, this cartridge can be adapted to anything from varmint shooting through elk and becomes quite versatile.
    The case capacity of the 7mm-08 is slightly less than the 7x57mm Mauser and performance with the heavier bullets of around 175-grains is about 100 to 150 fps less, which is not anything to get real excited about. The fact of the matter is that the 7mm-08 is adequate for most North American hunting, but is handicapped by only two commercial bullet loadings. Possibly Remington did not visualize the 7mm-08 as a hunting cartridge, but as primarily a target and silhouette round, so they stayed with the lighter-weight 120- and 140-grain bullets.

  14. #54
    Expert Member masood357's Avatar
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    7-30 Waters

    The 7-30 Waters was introduced by Winchester in 1984 for the Model 94XTR Angle Eject rifle nad carbine. The cartridge was actually the work of Ken Waters, a well-known and popular gun writer and ballistic expert. He began planning the cartridge in 1976, as a high-vlocity, flat-trajectory round for the short, handy, lever-action carbines. These are many problems to be overcome by those who would improve on the performance of the 30-30-class cartridges and lever-action rifles. Severe restrictions are imoosed by the tubular magazine, the lenght of the action and the permissible working pressure. However, by 1982 Ken had, by working within these constraints, developed a cartridge that would push the 139-grain 7mm bullet at close to 2600 fps. At this point, U.S. Repeating Arms Co., who now manufacturers Winchester brand rifles, became interested in the project and decided by 1983 to go ahead and produce Model 94 lever-action rifles for this cartridge.
    federal Cartridge Co. then worked on the final version of the cartridge, making various dimensional changes and opting for the 120-grain bullet weight because they could achieve higher velocity at less pressure than with the 139-grain bullet. The current commercial loading uses a 120-grain Nosler H-jacket bullet which develops a velocity at the muzzle of 2700 fps when fired from a 24-inch barrel.

    The 7-30 Waters does offer improved performance for those who like the lever-action carbine or rifle and should make a good deer/ black bear- class caliber. However, the majority of 30-30 lever-action fans prefer the short carbine since most are woods and heavy brush hunters, and the 7-30, with its light 120-grain bullet is unlikely to best the 30-30, 32 Special, 38-55, etc. in brush or woods. Also, it is not going to be the answer for the long-range plains or mountain hunter. When fired from a 20-inch barrel, its performance will be considerably reduced, so anyone interested in this caliber will be better served if they buy the rifle rather than the carbine. The light recoil of this cartridge makes it an excellent choice for a woman, boy or anyone who is recoil shy. The 7-30 would probably be at its best in broken-type country with shots varying from patches of brush and trees to open areas and shot ranging from, say, 75 to 175 yards ofr more.

  15. #55
    Expert Member masood357's Avatar
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    7mm Mauser (7x57mm)

    Developed as a military cartridge by Mauser and introduced in 1892, the 7mm Mauser was adopted by the Spanish government and chambered in a limited quantity of Model 92 Mauser bolt-action rifles, which were a modification of the Belgian pattern 89. In 1893, Spain adopted a new model Mauser in this same caliber. This rifle has been called the Spanish Mauser ever since, although it was also adopted by Mexico and a number of South American countries. Remington chambered their rolling block and Lee rifles for the 7mm about 1897, and later the Model 30. The Winchester Model 54 and 70 also chambered it. Currently, the Ruger Model 77 and Winchester Featherweight bolt action, plus the Ruger Number One single shot offer the 7mm as standard among American-made rifles. However, most British-and European-made bolt-action rifles and combination guns chamber the 7mm Mauser, as do many custom-made rifles each year.

    Although originally a military cartridge, the 7x57mm Mauser has proven itself as one of the best all-around sporting rounds ever developed. It is particularly useful in lightweight rifles because it delivers good killing power with moderate recoil. It has been used successfully on every species of big game on earth, including elephant. However, it is no elephant cartridge in the true sense of the term and its success is due largely to the hunting conditions and ability of the hunters who have used it. Ballistically, it is only less powerful than 270 Winchester or the 280 Remington. It is adequate for most American big game, but is perhaps on the light side for Kodiak bear or moose unless used by an experienced hunter. The 7mm Mauser was discontinued in American-made rifles about 1940 due to lack of popularity. Since the end of WWII, it has become increasingly common due to the influx of surplus 7mm military rifles for several years after the war. The wide selection 7mm bullets now available for handloading has also contributed to an increase in popularity.

  16. #56
    Expert Member masood357's Avatar
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    7x61mm Sharpe & Hart Super

    The 7x61mm was developed in the United States by Phillip B. Sharpe and Richard F. Hart. Its design was originally based on a rimless, experimental French 7mm semi-auto military cartridge. It was copyrighted and made available on a commercial basis in the Schultz & Larsen rifle in 1953. Ammunition was loaded and inported by Norma, and the final version was a belted case. Loaded ammunition offering a 154-grain bullet, as opposed to the original 160-grain.

    The 7x61mm Sharpe & Hart (now listed as the S&H Super) is very similar to the 275 H&H Magnum, a belted case chambered and loaded in England. It is in the short 7mm magnum class and its performance is the same as a number of other cartridges, mostly wildcat, based on the blown out and shortened 300 H&H Magnum brass case. However, the Sharpe & Hart case has a slightly larger rim and base diameter but its popularity in the U.S. was quite limited by competition from the 7mm Weatherby Magnum, the 7mm Remington Magnum and various wildcat developments. The 7mm S&H is, nonetheless, a very fine fine cartridge for any North American game and most African plains game. Although Norma no longer loads ammunition, brass cases for handloading will probably be available for a number of years. The fact that Norma once again loading ammunition will be good news for those who have rifles of this caliber.

  17. #57
    Expert Member masood357's Avatar
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    7mm Weatherby Magnum

    The 7mm Weatherby Magnum was developed in 1944 as one of a series of cartridges based on the necked-down and altered 300 H&H case. There are several similar wildcat versions, but Weatherby's design is the most popular due to the availability of commercial ammunition.

    The 7mm (or 284-caliber) has long been popular in the U.S. in various wildcat cartridges, yet the original 7mm Mauser never created any great enthusiasm, the result, possibly, of the poor (and underloaded) factory ammunition selection. The 7mm Weatherby Magnum, offered as a maximum performance cartridge to satisfy the demand to the 284 enthusiasts, is probably the best known widely used 7mm Magnums. This is due to the availability of factory-loaded ammunition with a good selection of bullet weights, and in part to the very fine Weatherby rifles. The 7mm has a slight edge over the 270 Weatherby on tough or dangerous game because it uses somewhat heavier bullets and churn up greater energy. However, if long-range varmint shooting is on the agenda, the 270 is better choice. The 7mm WM is adequate for any North American big game and all thin-skinned African game. The 7mm WM has, to a large extent, lost popularity to the 7mm Remington Magnum because the Remington version is available in many rifles less expensive than the Weatherby Mark V.

  18. #58
    Expert Member masood357's Avatar
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    7mm Remington Magnum

    A factory-designed, belted 7mm magnum introduced by Remington during 1962, the 7mm Remington Magnum was brought out at the same time as the improved, bolt-action 700-series rifles, which replaced the earlier Models 721, 722 and 725. Most other manufacturers have since added it to their lines. It took an American manufacturer nearly 40 years to realize that the 275 Holland & Holland (made long ago by Western Cartridge Co.) is a first-rate, medium-game, long-range caliber. The long line of 7mm wildcats and the 7x61S&H are much like the old 275 H&H, which came out in 192-1913.
    Remington chose to ignore the classic 7mm bullet, a 160-grain spitzer, in its 7mm Magnum loads. For some inexplicable reason, too, Remington handicapped the 150-grain by using a rather round-nosed bullet.

    The 7mm Remington Magnum is fine, long-range, gir game cartridge that could also be adapted to varmint hunting. There ia a good selection of 7mm bullets available and the handloader could make it do for just about anything. It has ample power for any North American big game and probably most thin-skinned African varieties. However, it would be an open-country, plains or mountain cartridge rather than a woods or brush number. Many will compare it with the 7mm WM or the 7x61mm Sharpe & Hart. Bitter arguments will ensue as to which is the best or most powerful. This will be akin to the ancient Greek pastime of discussing how many spirits can dance on the head of a pin. In other words, any difference in these cartridges will be strictly a matter of opinion or imagination. They all have about the same case capacity and none will do any thing the others can't duplicate. In fact, the 7mm Remington is hardly a new or brilliant design because it is largely a commercial version of several of the wildcat short-belted 7mm magnums (Auckley, Luft, Mashburn, etc.). Its principal advantage lies in the fact that it is a standard factory product that is widely distributed and available in well-made, moderately-priced rifles. Come to think of it, that's quite a bit to a lot of people. However, don't trade off your present 7mm magnum with the idea that the Remington round is going to provide some mysterious extra margin of power or knockdown.

  19. #59
    Expert Member masood357's Avatar
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    284 Winchester

    The 284 was introduced by Winchester in 1963 for their Model 88 lever-action and Model 100 semi-auto rifles, both of which have been discontinued, This is the first American commercial cartridge to have a rebated or undercut rim of smaller diameter than the body of the case, though British and European designers used this type of case years ago. For a short time, the Savage Model 99 lever action was available in 284. Some small outfits like Ultra-light often chamber the 284, and so does Browning.

    The 284 Winchester has the rim diameter of the 30-06 group, but the body diameter, nearly, of the belted magnums. This provides increased case capacity in a relatively short case. The cartridge is designed for medium-length actions and will increase the performance of these short, light rifles. Ballistics are practically identical to the 280 Remington and there would be no difference in killing power, range or capability between the two. (Except in some gun writer's imagination!) The 284 Winchester should be a good long-range cartridge for any North American big game under ideal conditions. It could also be adapted for varmint shooting. Some 270 or 7mm fans have always wanted a cartridge of this type for lever-action rifles and the 284 should have filled the bill. Unfortunately, not enough people bought Model 88 or 99 rifles.

  20. #60
    Expert Member masood357's Avatar
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    Hi brethern ! Now a days am not feeling well with very high fever n some throat n chest infections. As soon as I well, will b posting a lot for hunting rifle ammo,
    Regards.

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