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Thread: Hunting Rifle Cartridges of the World

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    Expert Member masood357's Avatar
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    Hunting Rifle Cartridges of the World

    17 Remington

    The 17 Remington was introduced in 1971 as a new caliber for Remington's 700 series bolt-action rifles. A short time later, Harrinton & Richardson adopted the caliber for their Model 317 bolt-action rifle. It is the smallest caliber high-powered centerfire rifle cartridge offered on a commercial basis to date. The case is based on the 223 Remington necked-down to 17 caliber, but with the shoulder moved back .087-inch to lengthen the neck, while retaining the same shoulder angle. The 17 Remington is very similar to, but not identical with, the 17-223 wildcat developed about 1965 or 1966 for Dave wolfe, publisher of RIFLE AND HANDLOADER magazines. Experiments with 17-caliber rifles actually go back to around 1944 when P.O. Ackley, the well known gunsmith and experimenter, developed the 17 Ackley Bee based on necking-down the improved 218 Bee case. There are number of other 17-caliber wildcat cartridges made by necking-down various 22-caliber centerfire cases such as 221 Remington Fireball, 222 Remington, etc.
    The 17 Remington has had a steady, though unspectacular, sales record since its introduction. It has both advantages and disadvantages as a centerfire-rifle caliber. Perhaps its greatest drawback is that it is a special-purpose cartridge suited almost exclusively for vermint shooting. For the person who wants a rifle only for that purpose, this is, of course, not a disadvantage , but those requiring a rifle for both vermint and deer hunting would be better served with some other caliber. Actually, some of the 17-caliber wildcat cartridges when loaded with custom-made, heavy-jacketed bullets, have demonstrated good killing power on deer. However, with the 25-grain hollowpoint bullet loaded by Remington and similar bullets available to the handloading trade, as made by Hornady and others, the 17 Remington must be rated as strictly a long-range vermint cartridge. On the other hand, it has certain advantages for that purpose, such as minimal recoil, redused muzzle blast and report, and a very high initial velocity of over 4000 fps. For a vermint only rifle, the 17 Remington offers excellent performance at practical ranges combined with good reloading economy. It can, however, be rather tricky to reload and requires close attention to details to ensure maximum accuracy and safety when loading for top velocity.
    Last edited by masood357; 09-03-2011 at 10:49 PM. Reason: Typing error

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    22 Hornet

    The 22 Hornet, based on the blackpowder 22 WCF, was developed during the late 1920s and early '30s. A group of experimenters at Springfield Armoury is credited with the introduction of the 22 Hornet, Col. Townsend Whelen, Captain G. L. Wotkyns, and many others being among the originators. Winchester produced the first commercial ammunition about 1930, and within a few years it had been standardized by all American manufacturers. The original rifles were based on Springfield military and Martini single shot actions. Winchester announced their Model 54 bolt action as available in 22 Hornet caliber during 1932, but apparently these rifles did not actually reach the market until early 1933. In the interim, savage Model 23-D bolt action rifles were available in 22 Hornet by August, 1932. At the present time, anschutz, Kimber, Krico, Brno and Ultra light Arms chamber bolt-action rifles fro the Hornet and Thompson/Center has their TCR and Contender in the caliber. In the Europe, the Hornet is known by the metric designation of 5.6x35Rmm.
    The Hornet was the first small-bore, high-velocity cartridge marketed in the United States primarily for varmint and small game shooting. It has never been commercially available in anything but b[B]olt-action and single shot rifles. Largely for this reason, it quickly established a reputation for superb accuracy at all practical ranges. No other cartridge of this type has ever caught on so fast or achieved such wide popularity. It has retained a measure of popularity, but suffers from competition with the 222 Remington and some of the 22 wildcats. It remains a fine choice for the man who desires economical shooting at ranges between 150 and 200 yards. It is a good cartridge for use in settled areas because of the light report and low incidence of ricochet. The 22 hornet cartridge is currently enjoying renewed interest and popularity on a limited scale.

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    Expert Member masood357's Avatar
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    Hi to All PG Bros !
    This is a very long thread with lot more data to come, Inshallah will be posting daily and will complete it in may be a month.
    Regards
    Last edited by masood357; 09-03-2011 at 10:59 PM. Reason: Typing error

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    220 Swift

    The 220 Swift was deeloped by Winchester and introduced in 1935 as a new caliber for their Model 54 bolt-action rifle. When the Model 70 Winchester bolt-action was first issued in 1936, the 220 Swift was one of the standard caliber offered, and continued to be until 1964 when it was discontinued. For a number of years the Belgian-made FN Mauser bolt-action was available for the 220 Swift, as was the Savage Model 112V. The Ruger Model 77, as well as Ruger single-shot, offer 220 Swift chamberings. The Model 70 Winchester is no longer made in this caliber although Winchester once again lists it in their ammunition catalog. However, Norma of Sweden lists the 220 Swift with a 50-grain bullet at 4111 fps, and they also sell unprimed cases for reloading. Hornady/frontier offers a 55-grain SP and a 60-grain HP loading. Ballastically, their loading duplicates the standard Winchester cartridge. It is a semi-rimmed case, as is the later 225 Winchester that replaced the 220 Swift in the winchester lineup.
    The 220 Swift is one of the most accurate super-velocity 22 cartridges ever developed. Swift barrels have never been noted for long life, but this factor has been negated to a large degree by development of modern, erosion-resistant berrel steels since WWII. Factory ammunition has always featured the 48-grain and 50-grain bullets, but the Swift will handle the 55-grain or heavier bullets quite well, at slightly reduced velocity. The 220 Swift is considered adequate on all animals up to deer, and some authorities insist that with proper bullets it is a good deer and black bear cartridge. However, the 220 Swift tends to be erratic in its performance on large animals. The factory bullet is designed for quick expansion on light animals and this may be the cause of most of the difficulty, but the debate continues.

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    Expert Member masood357's Avatar
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    222 Remington

    The 222 Remington was introduced by Remington in 1950 for their 722 bolt-action rifle which was superseded by the current 700 series. For a short time, the Remington Model 760 slide-action repeater was also available in this caliber. At the present time, practically every company that manufactures a high-powered bolt-action rifle, affers at least one version of the 222 Remington. In addition, the Valmet 412S, savage Model 24-V and 389 over/under combination guns chamber the 222, as does the Thompson/Contender and other single shots. The 222 Remington achieved great popularity in a very short time and appears to be sustaining its place, although the 223 Remington. because of the availability of military ammunition, has some in-roads in sales.
    The 222 Remington is in about the same class as the older 219 Zipper, but is rimless and adapted to modern bolt-action rifles. It is not based on any older case necked-down, but is of original design. It is a more or less scaled-down version of the 30-06, and fills the gap between 218 Bee and 220 Swift. It is better suited to the needs of the average person who desires a high-velocity 22 than any other cartridge currently available. A great many benchrest matches have been won with the 222 Remington, and it has a reputation for superb accuracy. It is an excellent 200 to 250-yard cartridge for the full range of varmint and small game. However, quite a few deer, antelope and black bear have fallen to the 222, and with the heavier 55-grain bullets and a thick jacket, it will kill such game at short range in open country.

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    Expert Member masood357's Avatar
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    22-250 Remington

    The 22-250 Remington was adopted early in 1965 as one of the calibers for the Remington 700 series bolt-action rifles, and also for the Model 40XB match rifle. Browning bolt-action rifles were offered in 22-250 caliber 2 years earlier. This is not a factory design, but rather a popular wildcat that has been around for many years. However, Remington's espousal of the round moved it into the commercial classification.
    There is some confusion regarding date of origin of the 22-250, which is based on the 250-3000 Savage case necked to 22-caliber. The parent cartridge was introduced in 1951 and a 22 version may have been made up experimentlly shortly thereafter. Harvey Donaldson, Grosvenor Wotkyns, J. E. Gebby, J. B. Smith and John Sweany all worked on versions of the 22-250 between about 1934 and 1937. J. B. Gebby and J. B. Smith are usually credited with having developed the present standardized configuration in 1937. However, there are different versions of this cartridge and much depends on which one is reffered to. The Gebby version was named the 22 "Varminter" and he obtained a copyright on the name. Other gunsmiths renamed it the 22-250. The Wotkyns version was the forerunner of the 220 Swift, although Winchester ended up using the 6mm Lee Navy case rather than the 250 Savage.
    At the present time, all of the major American, British and European rifle makers furnish bolt-action rifles in 22-250 chambering. In addition, the Ruger, Thompson/Center, and other single shots are available in this caliber.
    The 22-250 is one of the best balanced and most flexible of the high-powered 22 centerfires. It is also the most popular of the long-range 22 varmint cartridges and will probably be around for many more years, something that cannot be said with any confidence about one or two of the others. The 22-250 also has a reputation for outstanding accuracy and has been used with some success for benchrest shooting. Many individuals who have had experience with both 22-250 and the 220 Swift report that the former gives significantly longer case life with full loads than the latter. The 22-250, as with some of the othe rhigh-powered 22s, has been used successfully on deer and antelope when loaded with heavy-jacketed bullets designed to hold together and provide deep penetration. The effecticveness of these cartridges on deer-sized animals depends on bullet construction, and none of the factory loaded or other varmint-type loads should ever be used on big game. The reason, of course, is that the light varmint bullets are made to expand quickly and will usually inflict a severe surface wound on a large animal.

  7. #7
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    Very nice share .. keep it coming brother.

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    Senior Member Haider Shah's Avatar
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    Nice work please devote some energies to dig out about 37 CRS Rifleite, or What CRS stands for ? regards

  9. #9
    Expert Member masood357's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Haider Shah View Post
    Nice work please devote some energies to dig out about 37 CRS Rifleite, or What CRS stands for ? regards
    Stamps on the Metal parts
    'II.Q' or 'II' after the serial = 2nd Quality product/parts, found on Chilean Export M1886 and M1888 Mannlichers
    'A' in circle = Post-WW1 Austrian Army property mark - On Frommer Stop
    'AB' touching = August Bickel - Bayonet maker
    'A.C.' in oval = Italian mark, captured/or war reparation? M.95 rifle barrel shank flange marking
    'AZF' = Artilleriezeugsfabrik (Artillery Arsenal Factory) Austro-Hungarian capture mark
    'B' = Cyrillic V (Vojno = Military) Yugoslavian Kraguyevac (and other) Armory mark - On M95M rifles
    'B' under crown = House of Liege Belgian proof mark (Belgian made weapons)
    'BMF' = Berndorfer Maschinen Fabrik, Austria, on bayonets, cartridges
    'C' Crowned = Yugoslavian mark, on M95 barrel shank
    'CE' in oval = Italian captured? or war reparation? M.95 rifle barrel shank marking
    'CET' = Cetnivo (Czech Government Police or Gendarmerie) on buttplates, bayonets
    'CHS' = Czech post-WW1 M.95 proofmark
    'CM' = Early Czech Army mark, on M.95's [Romanian mark on VZ24 Mausers]
    'CRS' = Czech post-WW1 M.95 proofmark
    'CSZ' = CzechoSlovenska Zbrojovka, on M.95 bayonets
    'DVF' = (Cyrillic A,B,Phi) Darzhavna Voenna Fabrika (State Military Factory, Bulgaria), repaired guns mark
    'E.A.IX.' = Erzeugungs Abteilung 9 (Production Department 9) on various Ersatz bayonets
    'EN' = Ejercito Nacional (Argentine National Army contract) on Werndl rifles
    'F' Crowned = Represents Prince Ferdinand of Bulgaria, on M1888-M1895 guns
    'F.G.GY.' = Fegyver és Gépgyár symbol, on Hungarian made receivers, bayonets, 1891-1918
    'H' under a Crown = Yugoslavian mark, on M95 barrel shank
    'Jung' = E.S. Jung bayonet maker
    'K' = 'Kontroll' Steyr inspection stamp, on small parts
    'KR-23' cyrillic = Polish marked M.95 Picture
    'M' Crowned = Yugoslavian mark, on M95M stock
    'NI' under crown = Nikita I, king of Montenegro (on Montenegrin Gasser revolvers)
    'NPv' = Nitro-Proof mark on Austro-Hungarian pistols
    'OEWG' = The Steyr Factory Symbol, on numerous receivers M90 or prior models, bayonets
    'P' in a box = Polish inspection mark
    'R' = Budapest manufacture, on small gun parts
    'R' on bayonets = Resicka, Austrian bayonet maker, Vienna
    'S4' after Lion = Czech Military District Hradec Kralove, post WW1, on M95 rifles (need info on other districts)
    'SR' superimposed = Simon Redenbacher, bayonet maker, Linz, Austria
    'ST.Striberny' = Stanislaus Striberny, bayonet maker, Vienna
    'T' circled = Tiegelgussstahl Gun rebarrelled with a new type quality steel (Austrian mark). Also on post-WW1 Czech guns Picture
    'T' Crowned = Yugoslavian Nitro proof mark, on M.95 barrel at the receiver
    'v' = Small inspection mark on Czech owned guns barrels or receivers
    'VF' (Cyrillic B and phi) Voenna Fabrika (Military Factory, Bulgaria), repair mark Picture
    'V&N' = Vogel & Noot, Wartberg, on edged weapons
    'Winternitz' = Joachim Winternitz, Independent bayonet maker in Steyr, Austria
    'WKC' = Weyersberg Kirschbaum und Co, Solingen, Germany - edged weapons
    'WP' = W. Perkun, Polish bayonet manufacturer
    'WWF' superimposed = Wiener WaffenFabrik GmbH, on edged weapons, on captured guns
    'Z' = Zbrojownia (Armory) Polish repair facility marks
    'Z' or crossed swords = Ludwig Zeitler, Vienna - on edged weapons
    'Z' in circle = Zbroyovka Brno, Czech manufactured parts
    'Zb Kr' cyrillic = Zbrojownia Krakow, Polish marked bayonet Picture
    'Zbr-1' cyrillic = Zbrojownia 1, Polish Arsenal depot mark

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    Expert Member masood357's Avatar
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    @ Sir Haider Shah

    The Compagnies Républicaines de Sécurité (CRS) (English: Republican Security Companies) are the riot control forces and general reserve of the French National Police. The CRS were created on 8 December 1944 and the first units were organised by 31 January 1945. The CRS were reorganized in 1948. The task for which they are best known in popular culture is crowd and riot control and re-establishment of order.

    The expression les CRS means the whole force. It would be understood in the feminine plural insofar as the noun compagnie is feminine, but is typically used in the masculine to refer to the troops, most of whom are male (thus, masc.pl.). In French slang un CRS (masc.sg.) may mean "a CRS man".

    With best regards,

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    Expert Member masood357's Avatar
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    @ Haider Shah

    Sir ! Does ur rifle have a large opening right in front of trigger guard ?

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    Expert Member masood357's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aquarius View Post
    Very nice share .. keep it coming brother.
    In this thread data will be kept on coming and coming, excuse for tonight as working on CRS matter.

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    Senior Member Haider Shah's Avatar
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    Sir thanks indeed, what a valid information you have revealed.This Rifle does have a slot in front of trigger guard having a slider type of object, beneath its fixed magzine, whose movement is controlled through a catch inside the the trigger guard.It would be more appropriate to send some close pictures of this rifle if you allow and your thread doesn't get spoiled in order to get a fair opinion about what ammunition it takes.Looking forward, regards

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    Member bigbore's Avatar
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    very informative thread and a good read..
    thank you...
    If Adam wouldve been a good hunter, all mankind would still be in Paradise. But instead he was a good husband and listened to his wife..

  15. #15
    Expert Member masood357's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Haider Shah View Post
    Sir thanks indeed, what a valid information you have revealed.This Rifle does have a slot in front of trigger guard having a slider type of object, beneath its fixed magzine, whose movement is controlled through a catch inside the the trigger guard.It would be more appropriate to send some close pictures of this rifle if you allow and your thread doesn't get spoiled in order to get a fair opinion about what ammunition it takes.Looking forward, regards
    Sir ! The thread is all yours, give me some detailed pics of ur rifle and by the grace of Almighty i will Inshallah reveal the caliber and try my best to get some detailed info of ur rifle ASAP.
    Sir ! It made me little sorrow, that my senior bro is asking permission to post on my thread. THREAD BHI AAPKA, HUM BHI AAP KAY, AUR JO KUCH MERAY PAAS PRINTED FORM MAY HAY WOH SAARAY FORUM KA.
    Inshallah post my whole book collection on this forum.
    Regards.

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    Expert Member masood357's Avatar
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    224 Weatherby Magnum

    The Weatherby line of proprietry cartridges was somewhat incomplete for lack of an ultra-velocity 22. The 220 Weatherby Rocket was actually an improved wildcat based on the 220 Swift case, and Weatherby never manufactured ammunition of this caliber. The 224 Weatherby Magnum was introduced in 1963, but according to the late Roy Weatherby, the development work went back 10 years or so prior to this. Introduction of the cartridge was delayed due to lack of an entirely suitable action. The caliber is available in a reduced-size version of the Weatherby Mark V rifle and at present no one else chambers it.
    The 224 Weatherby lies ballitically between 222 Remington and the 220 Swift. It is a belted case with the advantages inherit in this type of construction. For the handloader, it eliminates certain headspace and case-stretch problems and should provide maximum case life. It is an excellent long-range varmint cartridge with performance very similar to the 22-250 Remington. Its popularity has been determined largely by economic factors. One can buy a Remington, Ruger or Winchester bolt action in 22-250- caliber for about half the price of a Weatherby. The 224 Weatherby is, neverthless, a very fine choice to those who don't mind the extra cost.
    Last edited by masood357; 25-03-2011 at 12:22 AM. Reason: typing error

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    Expert Member masood357's Avatar
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    @ Sir Haider Shah

    AOA Sir !

    Have seen the pics of ur rifle in ur JEWELS AND PEARLS ( Junk n Scrap) thread and am feeling so ashamed that I havent figured out the exact calibre of your rifle, beside going through my books on Wednesday night and now searching through net for the last 5 hours but a little satisfied that it was not all in vain, as I figured out your rifle assembly resembles to Steyr M1895 so im mentioning a little detail of that rifle below as only the full stutzen type wooden furniture differs in between these two rifles.
    The Steyr M1895 rifle, also known as Steyr-Mannlicher M95 straight pull rifle, was developed by famous Austrian arms designer Ferdinand Ritter Von Mannlicher. Based on his previous M1890 design, this rifle was manufactured in Austro-Hungarian Empire at state arms factories in Steyr (Austria) and Budapest (Hungary). More than 3 millions of M95 rifles were produced between 1895 and 1918. This rifle was issued to Austro-Hungarian army, and, after the fall of the Empire, to the Austrian and Hungarian armies. Originally produced in 8x50R caliber, in 1924 some of M95 rifles were converted to the German 7.92x57 Mauser (also known as 8x57 Mauser) ammunition. These converted rifles featured shorter 58 cm barrels, were designated as M95/24 and used in Yugoslavia and Bulgaria. This conversion gave away with original Mannlicher en bloc clip, and replaced it with Mauser stripper clips. Since 1930 Austria converted most of the M95 rifles to the more powerful 8x56R M30 ammunition, using the same Mannlicher en bloc clips. These rifles were designated as M95/30, and marked with the letter "S" on the receiver ring. Hungary started to convert their rifles to the same 8x56R ammunition in 1931, with the upgraded rifles being marked with the letter "H" on the receiver ring. Many of the M95 rifles were used during the Word War 2 by the Hungarian, Bulgarian and Italian armies, as well as by some German police forces.
    Ferdinand Von Mannlicher developed his first straight-pull bolt action rifle by 1884, and by 1885 he developed the famous Mannlicher en block clip, which was inserted into the box magazine from the top, and automatically ejected through the opening at the bottom of the magazine as the last round was chambered. This significantly speed up the loading process, compared to the earlier designs with magazines loaded by single rounds; the problem was that such magazine could not be loaded with loose rounds without the clip. As a result, during the early part of the 20 century Mannlicher en bloc clip was generally replaced by the Mauser-type stripper clip. Earliest Mannlicher straight-pull rifles have had not so strong wedge-locking system, but in 1890 he introduced a straight pull bolt action with rotary bolt head with two lugs, which he latter used in M95 rifles.
    Steyr Mannlicher M95 bolt has a separate head with two frontal locking lugs; bolt head was inserted into the bolt body from the front. Bolt body had internal spiral-shaped ribs, with matching spiral-shaped cuts in the tail of the bolt head. These ribs and cuts forced the bolt head to rotate on the pull of the bolt body, locking and unlocking the action. Box magazine contained five rounds in en bloc clips; as the magazine emptied, the clips were ejected from the opening at the bottom of the magazine. Non-empty clips could be removed from the top with the bolt open, by depressing the clip catch inside the triggerguard. One specific feature of this system was that the clip has specific "top" and "bottom" sides, and could not be loaded into the rifle upside down. The safety was located at the rear left side of the bolt. Large ear-shaped cocking handle at the rear of the bolt served as a manual cocking handle, to re-cock the action without operating the bolt. M95 rifles were issued with detachable knife bayonets. Other than basic rifle, M95 also was issued as Stutzen (short rifle or carbine, with bayonet lug), and slightly shorter cavalry carbine (without bayonet lug).
    These rifles are generally considered as a reasonably strong and accurate, but somewhat sensitive to mud and dirt, as most others military straight pull bolt action rifles. There were several downsides, inherent to these rifles. The straight pull bolt lacked the powerful initial extraction, provided by most rotating bolt actions. Large opening at the bottom of the magazine easily collected the dirt and dust into the magazine. The en block clip loading system does not allow the partially full magazine to be refilled without removing the non-empty clip first. The use of rimmed ammunition resulted in the non-symmetric clip which could be inserted into the action only with one side down; upper side of the clip has stamped serrations to hold it while loading (this particular problem was cured in Italian Carcano rifles, which used rimless ammunition, and symmetric clips).



    Moreover, visited a site named GUNBOARD.COM, gone through the threads of the site and I found a similar querry you made and I found that these rifles are also chambered in 6.5X55 Rimmed.
    As u mentioned the J Jaffery King st ,St James London. markings of ur rifle and I tried to search the net with the reference of these markings on various search engines and got a retailer's address resembling to the marking of ur rifle, which im also mentioning below.

    Moore & Woodward. 64 St James St, London. 1843-1972.
    The address is from the website named (www.firearmsmuseum.org.au).

    Its seems that some gunsmith named "Jeffery" from the above mentioned London address had done some refurbishment work or may be customized the famous Steyr M1985 rifle for its previous owner which has reached you.
    Thats all I got after this 9 hours toil n moil in which I left no stone unturned.
    Sorry once again for not fullfilling your querry completely and its making me really really sorrow that I havent served a senior forum member correctly.
    Hope my unresposibility be neglected
    Regards.
    Last edited by masood357; 25-03-2011 at 05:58 AM.

  18. #18
    Senior Member Haider Shah's Avatar
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    Sir your magnanimity in addressing the matter is acknowledged , the rifle has travelled long distances including Dara few years back in search of its ammunition but the journey could not be fruitful. I was suggested by my well wishers to stop the search for 37 CRS and get it converted to 7 mm or 8mm rifle but my pugnacious search is on and puts precious time of courteous personalities like you in turmoil, request you to take it at least priority. Well i am posting few additional pics for reference sake just to facilitate your thesis . With lot of regards and well wishes for your prosperity n sound health
    Attached Images Attached Images      

  19. #19
    Lord of War hunter468's Avatar
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    very nice and informative share.keep it up
    Life is too short to hunt with an ugly gun!

  20. #20
    Senior Member Haider Shah's Avatar
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    I am trying to attach few pictures of its bolt group, well i have also tried 6.5 caliber ammunition but in vain. The search of 37 CRS ammunition has actually enabled me to collect different type of ammunition .
    Attached Images Attached Images         

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