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Thread: World handgun rounds

  1. #21
    Member Emeritus Enigmatic Desires's Avatar
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    great work masood bhai
    "Keep a complete control over your Temper and Anger because I never found anything more beneficial at the end and producing more good results then such a control" Hazrat Ali (A.S) tz.enigmatic@gmail.com

  2. #22
    Lord of War Tiger Roars's Avatar
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    Masood Sahib good
    I've hunted almost everyday of my life, the rest have been wasted.

  3. #23
    Expert Member masood357's Avatar
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    @ All my PG Brethern
    Thanks for the appreciation and the time u bros spend for reading. A couple have left to post in this HANDGUN section, Inshallah by tomorrow will be completed, and will be starting Rifle Rounds Thread for which I have lot lot more data, and future plans are for 12 GUAGE AMMO, NITRO EXPRESS CARTRIDGES and most likely to every gun owner THE VERSTILE .22. Suggestions Welcomed from seniors.
    Regards.

  4. #24
    Expert Member masood357's Avatar
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    44 Smith & Wesson Russian

    Designed by S&W for their Russian Model military revolver in 1870, the first models of which were made for the Imperial Russian Army. A civilian or commercial model was also manufactured beginning in 1878. The Colt Bisley Target Model and their regular single action were available as well as several others. The German firm of Ludwig Loewe made copies of the S&W Russian Model revolver in the same caliber.Originally loaded with blackpowder, the 44 S&W Russian was one of the most accurate and popular cartridge of its day. It was the favorite of Buffalo Bull Cody and many other western characters. Good accuracy was reported clear out to 200 yards, and some of the first precision handgun shooting was accomplished with this cartridge. It was made obsolete by the 44 S&W Special, which was better suited to smokeless powder. Any gun chambered for the 44 Special or the 44 Magnum will also shoot the 44 Russian. It makes a fairly good feild cartridge, but it is not as the 44 Special because of the old blackpowder revolvers it was used in, and the fact that it can't be handloaded to the same level. Cases can be made by trimming 44 Special brass back to a length of 0.97 inch.

  5. #25
    Expert Member masood357's Avatar
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    44 Smith & Wesson Special

    With the coming of the bulkier smokeless powder the 44 Russsian cartridge was proved not quite large enough to permit efficient use of full charges of the new propellants. The 44 Special, about .2-inch longer, was designed to eliminate this problem, while using the same bullets as the older 44 Russian. The cartridge was introduced about 1907. Both Colt and S&W made revolvers of this caliber and a few Spanish and other European revolvers were also made to handle it. There has been a rebirth of interest in the 44 Special the past few years.
    The 44 Special was for many years one of our most accurate and powerful big-bore revolver cartridges. However, it was never loaded to its full potential by the factory, and it was left to the individual handloader to develop truly effective hunting loads. Experiments by men like Elmer Keith to produce a big game potential in the revolver culminated in the 44 Magnum. The 44 Special is still popular for target or field use and can be handloaded to nearly equal the 44 Magnum. However, revolvers for the 44 Special aren't strong enough to handle loads as heavy as those used in 44 Magnum.

  6. #26
    Expert Member masood357's Avatar
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    44 Smith & Wesson Magnum

    Developed by Smith & Wesson and Remington and introduced in 1955 for a new heavy-frame 44 Magnum revolver. Ruger, S&W and others make revolvers for this cartridge. Its development was inspired and much preliminary wark done by Elmerr Keith and that group of hand-cannon fanatics who insisted on the ultimate in handgun accuracy, range and power. Ruger introduced a semi-auto carbine in 44 Magnum caliber in 1961.
    In addition to being the world's most powerful commercial handgun cartridge, the 44 Magnum also has a reputation for superb accuracy. It is used more as a feild or hunting round than anything else, but a few police officers favour it because of its ability to penetrate an automobile body. It takes a seasoned handgunner to shoot it well as both recoil and muzzle blast are considerable. It is the only handgun commercial cartridge that can be considered really adequate for big game. It has been used to take deer, black bear, elk, moose and the big Alaskan brown bears. It has often been chambered in custom-made rifles, with the Model 1892 Winchester or the Remington Rolling Block action generally used. In a 20 or 24-inch rifle barrel, the standard factory load will develop about 1720 fps at the muzzle and 1580 fp of energy. This equals the energy of the 30-30 rifle cartridge. It is a very flexible cartridge when handloaded, and can be made to cover any situation within the scope of the modern revolver. Very few, if any, police departments use it because it is simply too much for the average police officer to handle. Its use in police work is largely a personal thing.

  7. #27
    Expert Member masood357's Avatar
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    45 Winchester Magnum

    The 45 Magnum was first listed in the 1979 Winchester gun and ammunition catalog although reports of the impending release were circulating some 2 years earlier. the cartrigde is used in the on-again-off-again Wildey gas-operated semi-auto pistol and has also been adopted as a standard chambering for the Thompson/Center Contender single shot pistol. Although a number of gun writers were previleged to testfire the big Wildey 45 Magnum pistol during 1979, it still isn't vailable even by 1989. The cartridge is essentially an elongated version of the 45 ACP. Both the gun and the cartridge were developed initially for silhouette competition , but with the ballistics deeloped (a230-grain bullet at a muzzle velocity of 1400 fps) the cartridge may become popular hunting round.
    The 45 Winchester Magnum develops 72 percent higher velocity and 200 percent greater energy than the standard 45 ACP and is in the same class as the 44 Magnum revolver cartridge. The Wildey 45 Magnum along with the 44 Auto mag, the Desert Eagle and the LAR Grizzly are the only auto-pistols that truly are qualified as big game handguns. Although the potential is there for a fine combination silgouette and huntin pistol, it is difficult to perdict hoe well the Wildey pistol and the 45 Magnum cartridge would have been received by the shooting public. The price was high, and for strictly silhouette shooting, the much lower-priced Thompson/Center Contender in the same caliber might appeal to many potential buyers. The availability of commercial ammunition with hunting-type bullets would also be a factoe, although there is a good variety of such bullets available to the handloader.

  8. #28
    Expert Member masood357's Avatar
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    45 Automatic (45 ACP)

    Developed by John Browning in 1905 and adopted by the United States Ordinance Department, with the Colt-Browning automatic pistol, in 1911, it has also been made the official military handgun calibre by several other governments., notably Argentina, Mexico and Norway. The 45 Automatic is the most powerful military handgun cartridge in use today. It is also one of the most difficult to master. The Colt Government auto pistol and the Colt and Smith & Wesson Army Model 1917 revolvers are the principal arms chambered for the 45 ACP in the United States. Several Submachine Guns have used it, and about 1943 a number of Reising semi-automatic rifles were marketed in this calibre. Imitations of the Colt auto pistols have been made in Argentina, China, Korea, Norway, Spain and the U.S. It was replaced as of 1985 as the official U.S. military handgun cartridge by the 9mm Parabellum.
    The 45 ACP has been proven in combat all ove the world as having excellent stopping power. It has also developed into a first-class match cartridge with accuracy equal to the best. It requires a good deal of practice for the average person to develop any degree of skill with this cartridge, particularly when fired in the Colt Government Model Semi-Automatic. It is use far more for target shooting than hunting, its curved trajactory limiting its effective range. Although not a highly popular police calibre, a number of departments have switched from 38 Special to the 45 ACP in the past few years.

  9. #29
    Expert Member masood357's Avatar
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    45 Colt

    Introduced in1873 by Colt as one of the cartridges for their "Peacemaker" single-action revolver, both the cartridge and the revolver were adopted by the U.S. Army in 1875. This served as official handgun caliber until 1892 (some 17 years), when it eas replaced by the 38 Long Colt. The 45 Colt is one of the cartridges that helped civilize nd settle the old West. It was originally a blackpowder number loaded with 40 grains of FFg powder and a 255-grain lead bullet. Muzzle velocity of the original load was about 810 fps. The Ruger and several other single-action revolvers currently chamber it.
    One of the most famous American handgun cartridge and still a favourite with big-bore advocates, the 45 Colt has been around for about 90 years. It is extremely accuraet and has much knockdown and stopping power as any handgun cartridge except the 44 Magnum. It is popular feild caliber and can be handloaded to velocities in excess of 1000 fps. Old model blackpowder revolvers should not be used with any load developing more than 900 fps muzzle velocity. Although it has larger case than the 45 ACP or the 45 Auto-Rim, it is not quite efficient with smokeless powder. Using special revolvers, some very heavy loads have been worked up for the 45 Colt that put it in almost the same class as the 44 Magnum. Such loads should not be attempted except by an experienced person who fully understands what he is about and using those loads in a revolver that will stand the pressures generated by those heavy loads. This is another cartridge that has developed a rebirth of interest.

  10. #30
    Expert Member masood357's Avatar
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    45 Auto-Rim

    During WWI, both Colt and Smith & Wesson manufactured reolvers for the 45 ACP cartridge. This required the use of a half-moon clip to support and then eject the rimless 45 ACP. Thousands of these revolvers were sold to civilians after the war ended. In 1920, The Peters Cartridge Company introduced a rimmed version of the 45 ACP which eliminated the use of clips in the revolver. It was also loaded with a lead bullet to reduce excessive wear on the rifling inherent in the use of the jacketed 45 ACP.
    The 45 Auto-Rim, while practically identical in performance to the 45 ACP, is proba bly a better field or hunting cartridge because it can be handloaded with semi-wadcutter, hollowpoint and other lead hunting bullets. Using such bullets at slightly increased velocity, it is every bit as good as the 45 Colt revolver cartridge for small through medium game. Many war surplus 455 Webley revolvers have been altered to shoot the 45 Auto_Rim, and many of these are used in the field. the cartridge is probably more widely used than at anytime since it was introduced as a result of all the military revolvers sold following the end of WWII.

  11. #31
    Expert Member masood357's Avatar
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    45 Smith & Wesson

    An obsolete blackpowder cartridge introduced in 1875 for the Smith & Wesson Schofield revolver. This revolver was adopted by the U.S. Army in that year and used until 1892 when it, and the 45 Colt Army revolver, were replaced by the Colt Army & Navy Model in 38-caliber. Commercial ammunition of this caliber was loaded until 1940. It is believed by some authorities that General Custer used a Schofield revolver at the battle of the Little Big Horn
    The S&W Schofield revolver was a single-action, hinged-frame type. It employed a special, heavy barrel latch designed by General Schofield, hence the name. The cylinder of this revolver was not long enough to accept the 45 Colt so a shorter version was designed. The 45 S&W cartridge was loaded by government arsenals and used in both the Schofield model and the Colt Army to simplify supply. The 45 S&W can be used in any 45 Colt revolver, but the reverse is not true. Although the Colt single-action Army revolver is the one always depicted as the universal sidearm of the old West, nonetheless the S&W was quite popular. Although ammunition is no longer loaded and generally unavailable, one can make ammunition by shortening 45 Colt brass. These old guns were made for blackpowder so heavy smokeless charges should not be used.

  12. #32
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    @ Mr Masood .357
    Good work. The thread will be a reference for learning about cartridges.

  13. #33
    Supreme Member HussainAli's Avatar
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    Masood Bro, Simpliy Wounderful Info !!!!!!!!

    Regards
    A stitch in time saves Nine

  14. #34
    PakGuns Elite! Avais's Avatar
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    Masood brother. Thanks for very comprehensive info on various cartridges. Keep it up for more. thanks again.

  15. #35
    Masood bhai good research and an informative sharing, thnx
    History remembers only two colors: Red "The Blood of Martyrs" & Black "The Ink of Scholars"

  16. #36
    Lord of War hunter468's Avatar
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    masood sab cha gay o!!!!
    Life is too short to hunt with an ugly gun!

  17. #37
    Expert Member masood357's Avatar
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    @ Skeeter 60, HussainAli, avais, aschandio & hunter 468

    Thanks for the liking and appreciation, now a days working on another thread HUNTING RIFLE CARTRIDGES. Any query welcomed on any caliber as i have a lot more data in book form which is in my future plans to share on forum.
    Regards.

  18. #38
    Expert Member masood357's Avatar
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    45 Webley

    The earliest reference the author could locate regarding the 45 Webley was in the 1876 James Brown & Son gun catalog. However, it may have originated a year or two earlier than that. American companies manufactured it up to about 1939. The 1933 Winchester catalog says it is for "Webley and Bull Dog double action revolvers". It is obsolete.
    The 45 Webley is similar to the 450 revolver cartridge, but has a slightly longer case. The two will interchange in most revolvers. Originally a blackpowder cartridge, the 45 Webley was loaded with 20 grains of powder and a 230-grain bullet. Smokeless powder was also used in late loadings. In power it is in the same class as the 41 Short Colt, but probably has superior stopping power because of the larger heavier bullet. Ammunition could probably be made by cutting off 455 Webley cases.

  19. #39
    Expert Member masood357's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hunter468 View Post
    masood sab cha gay o!!!!
    Chaa jaanay ki kya baat hay. All I have is solely for forum sharing.
    Regards.

  20. #40
    Expert Member masood357's Avatar
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    450 Revolver/450 Adams

    The first center-fire revolver cartridge adopted by the British Army, it was adopted for the Adams revolver November, 1868 and saw service until replaced by the 476 (Mks I and II) in 1880. It was not a satisfactory military sound but became a popular commercial caliber. American companies loaded it to about 1940 and both Colt and Smith & Wesson chambered revolvers for it. Also loaded in Europe, it is now obsolete. It is often listed as the 450 short, 450 Adams or 450 Colt. A 450 Mk III was used in WWI as a reserve arm/cartridge.
    The 450 Revolver cartridge was originally a black powder round loaded with 13 grains of powder and a 225-grain bullet. Smokeless loads were also manufactured. The 450 can be fired in any 455 Webley revolver, and it was often used as a light target load. It is in about the same class as the old 44 S&W Russian and makes a fairly good short-range self-defense cartridge. Ammunition can be made from cut off 45 Webley cases.

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