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View Full Version : Break in Period :How long is yours?



Faisji
28-10-2011, 06:12 PM
"Break-in period" is the initial phase of controlled firing of a NIB weapon that is needed or though necessary to smooth out functions in the gun.These include trigger,feed ramps,slide to body fit and safety features on the weapons

The methodology used vary from from firing 2 mags of the standard FMJ ammo to test functionality /accuracy to upto 1000 rounds in case of some weapons.

Here's what my experience has been.

.22 Pistols
200 rounds of various loads to see which one works at first.The load that you can fir at-least 3 mags without FTE is the one that needs to put through about 200 of.

Tokarev(all variants)
They really don't need more than 2 mags worth of ammo for functionality test and a short break-in.the parts tend to polish out very quickly.

9mm Pistols
At-least 200 rounds through them and pretty much disregard and FTF/FTE in the initial 100 rounds unless you are getting them back to back.If JHP's are the EDC then use them after 5 or so mags of FMJ to finish the break-in.When you can fire a full mag of JHP without stoppage then the weapons is EDC worthy

.32 Pistols
They need about 100 rounds to smooth out the action.

1911 (Since i own one might as well)
I have been told by various owners on other forums to go at-least 500 on 230 grain hardball before trying to run exotic 165/185/200 grain loads.The standard is that the gun should function through a 100 rounds session flawlessly on FMJ before i introduce any JHP loads to it.Even then everyone agrees that the 230 grain JHPs should be used in the first instant until at-least a round count of 1000.



Would love to hear what you guys have to say

Trajan
28-10-2011, 06:35 PM
@ Faisji: Bro: excellent thread. I do not profess to know the 'magic solution' for break in , but for all my semi-auto pistols that i get NIB, after initial cleaning/ de-greasing, i run at least a 100 rounds in quick succession (15 rounds per mag and 1 minute between each mag till i hit the 100 round mark). This would make the gun very hot but not hot enough to do damage. Then another round of 100 rounds another day using the same procedure. My thought process behind this is that most important factor to check in my handguns is reliability and this is to ensure that any TIGHT clearances (that are so close that as the gun heats up and the metal expands, the components will rub enough to slow down the slide) would be smoothed out. The objective of breaking in a gun is to wear enough off of these tight-fit surfaces so there is sufficient clearance to enable them to slide smoothly over one another even when the gun is hot, while not adversely affecting accuracy.

All my pistols are tactical use type pistols which have fairly loose tolerances when compared with customs-tightly fit pistols.The criteria I use for determining whether a gun is broken in or needs more testing is how it ejects. A properly broken in gun will eject consistently, and the ejection will be the same whether the gun is hot or cold.

The number of rounds needed to break-in a gun will vary greatly depending on the type of gun, who built it , type of finish (blued or chromed), loads, and even springs.

Faisji
30-10-2011, 11:00 AM
Slide to Barrel fits

The break in will greatly be determined by the how tight the fit tolerances on the weapon are.Generally if you can use your index and thumb to rock the fitting then your break in is well under 200(all my TTs fall in that catogary apart from the zastava which smoothed out around 300 mark)

The Taurus 917 that i had was fairly tight and need to go through about 400 to become smooth in function.(specially the feed ramp and the main spring)

The Stoeger Cougar has fairly loose tolerances and the slide to frame finish is really smooth and the feed ramp is well polished and was able to handle mixed load mags NIB

The Taurus 1911 will definitely need a 500+ break due to extreme tightness and the quality of milling on the metal.i am currently at (230 grain FMJ)400 round count and it is showing great progress .The trigger has eased up considerably.The ejections are consistent and in one direction.I have decided not to run any JHp's in that gun until at-least i hit 750 (230 grain) round count so the feed ramp polishes out and the spring settles in to better handle the 185/200 grain loads.

Dragunov-svd
30-10-2011, 04:50 PM
Why would you want to break your gun :whistle:

Thanks for posting great info, im learning, learning......

Birdshooter007
31-10-2011, 09:50 PM
Why would you want to break your gun :whistle:

Thanks for posting great info, im learning, learning......
Not Break, BREAK IN....... to ensure your gun is performing as smoothly as it is supposed to.

Veegee
21-03-2012, 10:44 AM
This is a very helpful thread. however does anyone have feedback on Akdal pistols?

AK47
21-03-2012, 11:06 AM
This is a very helpful thread. however does anyone have feedback on Akdal pistols?

Welcome to the forum! I really don't think an Akdal handgun needs a break in. Better is to have a lighter installed into it, so one could keep it for some purpose at least!


Regards.

Faisji
21-03-2012, 01:49 PM
Welcome to the forum! I really don't think an Akdal handgun needs a break in. Better is to have a lighter installed into it, so one could keep it for some purpose at least!


Regards.

LULZ

But i have to agree the akdals on sale in pakistan have proven to be lemons so no one is really willing to buy them despite shop owners trying to sell them or pass them off as "turkish glocks"

Loser
22-03-2012, 04:06 AM
Welcome to the forum! I really don't think an Akdal handgun needs a break in. Better is to have a lighter installed into it, so one could keep it for some purpose at least!


Regards.

*lighter* LOL =D

Asif Ali
22-03-2012, 04:42 PM
Is there any role of using synthetic grease instead of oil in major parts and specially in slide/frame. Which one will bring down break-in rounds?

Faisji
22-03-2012, 07:11 PM
Is there any role of using synthetic grease instead of oil in major parts and specially in slide/frame. Which one will bring down break-in rounds?

I don't think it makes a significant effect on the break-in period but i prefer to use oil during break-in as it seeps out of the drop in area into all machine parts and generally keeps it lubed all over.