PDA

View Full Version : how to zero a scope ?



wasifali89
03-07-2011, 12:40 AM
i just bought a gamo whisper x for a friend and then bought a chinese BUSHNELL scope for it

its also a 3-9X40, the mounts are bought separately


i just spent the last few moments in the day light today trying to zero it but it was of no use

although i hope i would be able to do it in the morning but i would like some expert advice, how to start the process and valuable tips as well

plus i would like to know the maximum deviation a scope may offer at around 20 meters

Virk
03-07-2011, 02:24 AM
YOu must use lazer bore sighter, Then it will be very easy to zero your scope

"King Of Kings"
03-07-2011, 03:39 PM
so virk bro u mean he have to buy the laser bore sighter to zero his scope now??????
is there no other easy way to do this???????///

regards,

wasifali89
03-07-2011, 06:00 PM
i knew that way, but ive done it by firing pellets

it took alot of time but ill mention it in a few hours how i did it and it may help others

samhassnn
03-07-2011, 07:15 PM
Probably the easiest way to zero your scope would be to place a A4 size paper target about 10m away and start punching holes in it walking in your shots to the bull after its zeroed at that range move a bit farther or to your desired range and walk the shots to the bull once again, This is how I zeroed my first scope about 6 of 7 years back and probably the easiest way to zero a scope without a bore sighter. Also if you want to put your gun on paper which bore siting is then I would recommend going with your instinct and keeping your cheek in the position in which you would usually do when using open sights and then keeping the rifle in the same position gently raise your cheek and look through the scope and make any adjustments is necessary. Remember not to zero the scope in an of hand position but rather by resting it on a pillow on a table about chest high while you are seated.

PakistanFirst
03-07-2011, 07:29 PM
Read my post of July 1, 2011 under Sub-Forum: Rifles, "Mil-Dot Scope Really Mill Dot". Under this post you will see nine refereences to other posts dealing with scopes. Of those nine posts, two tell you how to sight scopes. If you need additional pointers, let me know.

SalmanHusain
03-07-2011, 08:53 PM
its very easy search on youtube!!!

wasifali89
04-07-2011, 01:04 AM
Probably the easiest way to zero your scope would be to place a A4 size paper target about 10m away and start punching holes in it walking in your shots to the bull after its zeroed at that range move a bit farther or to your desired range and walk the shots to the bull once again, This is how I zeroed my first scope about 6 of 7 years back and probably the easiest way to zero a scope without a bore sighter. Also if you want to put your gun on paper which bore siting is then I would recommend going with your instinct and keeping your cheek in the position in which you would usually do when using open sights and then keeping the rifle in the same position gently raise your cheek and look through the scope and make any adjustments is necessary. Remember not to zero the scope in an of hand position but rather by resting it on a pillow on a table about chest high while you are seated.

if i had ur post sometime earlier, i would have saved alot of time........... i started at 20m...... but ill post in pics tomorrow as i couldnt find tym today....... but obviously i used a pillow and a table

wasifali89
04-07-2011, 01:05 AM
its very easy search on youtube!!!

i was expecting actually valuable and critical points to start off.......... i didnt get em in tym and wasted tym nd effort

wasifali89
04-07-2011, 01:05 AM
Read my post of July 1, 2011 under Sub-Forum: Rifles, "Mil-Dot Scope Really Mill Dot". Under this post you will see nine refereences to other posts dealing with scopes. Of those nine posts, two tell you how to sight scopes. If you need additional pointers, let me know.

if i still encounter any problem, id refer to it

SalmanHusain
04-07-2011, 01:08 AM
ok i will post alink which i jst saw yesterday!!!

SalmanHusain
04-07-2011, 01:16 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lLirsAFpsfE

hunter468
04-07-2011, 12:52 PM
nice share salmanhusain brother

fluffmaster
04-07-2011, 05:29 PM
the scope is often not that simple to zero, as simple u see in this youtube video, because of a couple of factors, which , I,ll discuss below.

1.scope internal and external body alignment : most of the times our scope is not aligned to itself,(parallax to body)and when we mount it on the rifle, we have a tilted scope from the start. To minimize or compensate for this, put your scope on a stand, so that it is trully horizontal, and then watch through it. the cross hair must be pointing at some sharp aiming point. now slowly rotate the scope on the stand, clockwise , without disturbing the horizontality and keep watching at the aiming point. if the cross hair shifts, your scope is not truelly aligned to itself.

Ideally the scope should be zeroed by minimum possible number of elevation and deflection clicks. the reason is that the clicks incorporate additional tension of the springs holding the scope inside the scope body.these springs when unduly tense, gradually loose their holding accuracy. the best position with common scopes is the natural centre of clicks, as if u never used the knobs.
The only exception is when u have a very good and genuine scope, whose springs are not prone to tension degeneration, u may always zero the scope with the knobs provided. but such scopes are very rare (none below Rs.10,000/-)and it is best to remove the deviation by manual methods , such as using a thin metal foil on the mount , between the rifle and the clamps, for elevation. Personally I used cigarette foil for elevation correction. You would always note that whenever u first put a scope to ur rifle and shoot, the aim tends to be lower that is the rifle shoots below the aiming point. this is because of a phenomena known as "barrel droop".
for deflection or windage, if you see the shot displaced by over one inch, there is a serious issue of alignment and clamping of the scope. better eliminate that first, rather than playing around with the windage knob. Ideally windage knob should not be given more than four clicks, any side.


2. Scope hold on the rifle : the second most important factor is the scope hold, that is how firmly the scope is clamped to the rifle. I tell you, with most of the dianas , just forget about shooting accurately, if you dont have a single piece mount.most of the time the scope travels on the scope rail, with every shot.....some say that a stopper would eliminate this. I disagree. the stopper just fails after a few shots. best is to go for a single piece mount and see the difference it brings to your accuracy.

when you have done this, go to the shooting area, make a good firing position with sand bags or sand filled socks or anything which gives you a soft, jerk and flinch free hold.let the scope,s focus be adjusted to give you a very clear view of the target. aim carefully, as accurately as possible and keep shooting. dont notice every shot result. just fire five shots and see if u have shot close enough to make a one inch or smaller group at 20 yards. If u cant do that , there is something wrong with your aim, so fix that before attempting other things.

to conclude, I must say that people who think they can zero their scopes for elevation difference of over 4 inches only with knobs are living in fools paradise.

wasifali89
04-07-2011, 10:22 PM
@fluffmaster

i am unlucky that u posted abit late
but thanks for ur help


now for ur information

i have used the windage knob as if one or maybe more complete rotation and then back and again

the elevation didnt need that much of allignment


now at first i was having problems with the allignment of the mounts but then i removed it by naked eye
tell me how to test my zeroing

and my results yesterday were

5 out of 7 shots BULLS EYE....... gamo match pellets........... the target was a circle less than an inch in diameter.... at nearly 20 meters


i am actually worried on the spring tension problem u just mentioned

wasifali89
04-07-2011, 10:33 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lLirsAFpsfE


i will try this tomorrow or in a few days maybe........... this was really easy

SalmanHusain
04-07-2011, 11:27 PM
@fluffmaster excellent sir!! thanks hunter 468

fluffmaster
05-07-2011, 12:13 AM
@fluffmaster

i am unlucky that u posted abit late
but thanks for ur help


now for ur information

i have used the windage knob as if one or maybe more complete rotation and then back and again

the elevation didnt need that much of allignment


now at first i was having problems with the allignment of the mounts but then i removed it by naked eye
tell me how to test my zeroing

and my results yesterday were

5 out of 7 shots BULLS EYE....... gamo match pellets........... the target was a circle less than an inch in diameter.... at nearly 20 meters


i am actually worried on the spring tension problem u just mentioned

if u r hitting the bulls eye at 20 meters,,,no doubt u r grouping v well,,,,if u have compensated for less than an inch of windage by clicks, still u r safe. and as u say , u just havent touched the elevation knob,,,its certainly v lucky. keep shooting tomorrow as well, and if u stay in the bulls eye,,,u know u r zeroed....
and if u dont,,,just notice wether u still are grouping properly, i.e a close 1 inch group,,,if that stays close, just correct it with as little of windage clicks as possible,,,and if u r up or down of the bull,,,use cigarette foils, wrapped in two or four neat layers, and put it on ur front clamp to move up and rear clamp to move down,,,just dont mess with the elevation knob. continue shooting and if still u loose the mark on second or third day,,,u r certainly having a scope moving on the rail...the only solution then is to get a single piece mount.
loosing aim every second or third day, means ur scope has the two problems or one of the two. remove the spring tension issue, by clicking carefully, counting the clicks, or if u r confident , counting the rotations, all the way left or right, so that u know whats the maximum click count of ur scope. then divide it by 2, and return it to half.If u r lucky u have returned ur springs to natural tension,,,otherwise u r doomed.
ideally the alignment test should be performed on a new scope....in all likelihood the new scope shouldnt loose aim by rotation of the scope,,,however if it does, adjust it by as little no of clicks as possible, otherwise take ur scope to the shop and show it to him, that its not aligned and ask for a proper replacement.

Ameer
05-07-2011, 12:12 PM
nice share Fluffmaster

wasifali89
05-07-2011, 03:08 PM
if u r hitting the bulls eye at 20 meters,,,no doubt u r grouping v well,,,,if u have compensated for less than an inch of windage by clicks, still u r safe. and as u say , u just havent touched the elevation knob,,,its certainly v lucky. keep shooting tomorrow as well, and if u stay in the bulls eye,,,u know u r zeroed....
and if u dont,,,just notice wether u still are grouping properly, i.e a close 1 inch group,,,if that stays close, just correct it with as little of windage clicks as possible,,,and if u r up or down of the bull,,,use cigarette foils, wrapped in two or four neat layers, and put it on ur front clamp to move up and rear clamp to move down,,,just dont mess with the elevation knob. continue shooting and if still u loose the mark on second or third day,,,u r certainly having a scope moving on the rail...the only solution then is to get a single piece mount.
loosing aim every second or third day, means ur scope has the two problems or one of the two. remove the spring tension issue, by clicking carefully, counting the clicks, or if u r confident , counting the rotations, all the way left or right, so that u know whats the maximum click count of ur scope. then divide it by 2, and return it to half.If u r lucky u have returned ur springs to natural tension,,,otherwise u r doomed.
ideally the alignment test should be performed on a new scope....in all likelihood the new scope shouldnt loose aim by rotation of the scope,,,however if it does, adjust it by as little no of clicks as possible, otherwise take ur scope to the shop and show it to him, that its not aligned and ask for a proper replacement.

ok ill do it and then tell the results tonight if i can do it today or maybe tomorrow

Tiger Roars
05-07-2011, 07:42 PM
Fluffmaster,,nice sharing.

fluffmaster
05-07-2011, 08:40 PM
Fluffmaster,,nice sharing.

thanx friends

wasifali89
06-07-2011, 12:23 AM
i used GAMO magnums today and was constantly hitting bulls eye.........

so didnt really played with the knobs

thanks any ways fluffmaster

fluffmaster
13-07-2011, 01:53 PM
I must admit that although I am still a novice in rifle scope use, there are some fundamental features of scope accuracy that I have comprehended and applied in practical situations. I would certainly share them with fellow enthusiasts.

Its so common to hear new air gunners complaining of total chaos after putting a scope to their rifle.I have already, in my earlier posts in this thread, highlighted some factors which are the culprit causes. Today I wish to further deliberate the factors effecting accuracy,and how to overcome them.I think its good to take a look at a scope and understand the parts first :

http://i1206.photobucket.com/albums/bb453/jhallu/ExternalNomenclatureMedium.jpg



What Makes a Scope Accurate?
Proper Focus, Correction of Parallax Error; Adjustment Consistency; and a Solid, Well Aligned Mounting System.

What Makes a Scope See Better?
Lens Quality, Lens Coatings, and Objective Lens Size... And knowing how to use the Fast Focus Eyepiece, which is provided in most of quality scopes.

Proper Focus

many users complain of having difficulty seeing through the scope, the images seem blurry.This is a result of improper focus.Remember that the scope needs to be focused only once-for YOUR eyes. If another shooter uses your scope, it must be refocused for their eyes. The following steps will assist in proper focusing of your scope

Look through the scope at a bright background such as the sky or a well lighted wall. (Never look at the sun!) Focusing is easier with the scope mounted on a rifle or some firm object.
Turn the eyepiece, counter clockwise, until the reticle appears slightly blurred.
Turn the eyepiece, clockwise, until the reticle comes into focus.
Look away from the scope for a few seconds. Then look back quickly through the scope. If the reticle appears sharp and clear the instant you place your eye to the scope, the focus has been properly set for your eyes. Try this several times.
If the reticle appears fuzzy, or requires a little time to come into sharp focus, further adjustment is needed. Turn the eyepiece clockwise another full turn and repeat STEP
Keep doing this until the reticle is sharp the instant you put your eye to the scope.

Parallax Error or Adjustable Objective Riflescopes

Parallax error occurs when changing positions of your eye,(in relation to the eye piece) will change the point of aim of your scope. The error is related to the distance the target is from you. Most sporting rifle scopes are set to be Parallax Error-Free at 100 yards. That is, when aiming through your scope at a target 100 yards away, the point of aim stays the same regardless of the position or movement of your eye.

Parallax error compensation and focus adjustment are different things. Some people often call parallax adjustment an "Adjustable Focus" or "Side-Focus". It's NOT. You set the scope to be parallax error free at a certain distance. And if the image is not in focus, you focus it with your eyepiece. This is where the "Fast Focus Eyepiece" plays its role.

Parallax error test

It’s pretty simple. To test your scope for parallax error, position your scope or scoped rifle in sand-bags so that it is aiming at a 50 yard target. Now, without touching the gun or the scope, move your head from side to side while looking through the scope. If the crosshair moves around on the target, you’re seeing parallax error at that distance. How much error depends on how much movement. To find the distance where your scope is parallax error-free, do this experiment at 40, 30, and 20 yards. The distance where it is error free will also be the distance at which you shoot most accurately.

Scopes with an adjustable objective (AO) allow you to set the distance at which they are parallax error-free. These scopes are also designated as Parallax Adjustable (PA), Side Focusing (SF), etc. It's misleading to call this feature "focusing" because its really parallax correction. Its also important to note that the distance markings on the parallax adjustment are quite often not exact.

How critical Parallax adjustment is?

Most scopes have a fixed parallax setting that is exactly correct for shooting at only "one" specific distance. If your scope has a parallax adjustment it can be perfectly adjusted for shooting at any distance, so that your crosshair will appear to be rock solid, no matter where your eye is positioned. The crosshair should appear stationary, as if they were painted on your target.This is very important when the "exact" position of your eye is not always concentric with your scope. The slightest variance can make a huge difference. Scopes of lower magnification are not usually supplied with parallax adjustment , because at lower powers the amount of parallax is so small as to have no importance for practical, fast target acquisition.So if u are using a scope of magnification power upto 4 times, u are safe not to bother about the parallax error.For pinpoint aiming purposes,which is accomplished by greater magnification, parallax error is most critical at under 100 yard distances.

Take a look at the images, indicating the position of parallax knob,or AO (adjustable objective) ring, on various scopes.The first three images are of scopes with parallax compensation around the objective lens.The rest of images are of scopes with parallax knob exactly opposite the windage knob, which is the most common scope design. note the large optional side wheel on the Leapers scope (last image)which makes parallax adjustment very easy.



http://i1206.photobucket.com/albums/bb453/jhallu/Swift687MSmall.jpg

http://i1206.photobucket.com/albums/bb453/jhallu/delta22.jpghttp://i1206.photobucket.com/albums/bb453/jhallu/8-Parallax-ring.jpghttp://i1206.photobucket.com/albums/bb453/jhallu/image008.jpghttp://i1206.photobucket.com/albums/bb453/jhallu/image010.jpghttp://i1206.photobucket.com/albums/bb453/jhallu/9-Leapers-optional-s_AFC49.jpg


To adjust the parallax ensure that your scope reticle be clear and crisp on the object as you sight down your scope.
Next adjust the parallax while you move your head up and down slightly. Keep adjusting until there is no movement in the reticle in relation to the target.


Eye relief

This refers to the distance at which you must place your eye behind the eyepiece of the scope in order to see the entire field of view. Although the optimum distance is quoted in specifications, there is usually some latitude so that your eye need not be placed at exactly the same place each time in order to see the whole field of view.Most of the scopes are designed to give you a clear sight pic at 3-4 inches from the eye piece to your eye.Eye relief changes on most scopes as they have a variable magnification, and eye relief depends on magnification. When the scope is adjusted for higher magnification, the eye relief will decrease; when it is adjusted for lower magnification, the eye relief increases.
It is important to have perfect or at least good eye relief , before aiming at a target , as variations in eye relief will adversely effect the accuracy.

Magnification or Power

The scope is often named by two numbers separated by an "x". For example: 3-9x40. The first number is the power or magnification of the scope. With a 3-9x40 variable power scope, the object being viewed appears to be 3 to 9 times closer than you would see it with the unaided eye. The second part number (40) is the diameter of the objective or front lens. The larger the objective lens, the more light that enters the scope, and the brighter the image. The higher magnification of a scope, however, is a double-edged sword. As magnification increases, many other things decrease: field of view,image steadiness, and sometimes image sharpness. Higher magnification also eats light. An 8-power scope will show the same image darker than a 4-power, if everything else is the same. There are ways to increase the amount of light that passes through the scope, such as larger lens diameters and even a large scope tube diameter, but if that goes too far you get a large scope that is more difficult to mount.

The challenge in using a scope is to make magnification work for you and not against you. The basic rule is to use magnification sparingly--never sacrifice image detail or steadiness for image size. Small, steady, and sharp view is much preferred to a large, wobbly, and fuzzy scene, especially on small game. A variable power scope should be set to its lowest power for fast target acquisition. High powers should be reserved for long range, controlled shots.


will deliberate on other aspects of scope accuracy shortly

Umair Bhaur
31-08-2011, 02:32 PM
Dear All,

1. First of all be sure that you have purchased an Airgun Rated scope which is capable of holding double recoil of spring airgun.

2. Cut two V shaped pieces of wood allign them and fix then with nails on a chip board

3. Be sure that the above mentioned set up is such that you can easily put the scope in the V slots of the set up and can rotate the scope.

4. Take the scope in hand and fully tight the windage knob. Now open it to full extent and count the number of rounds the knob takes to get it opened completely.

5. Divide the total rounds with 2 and retight the knob to that extent. This will get you near the optical centre. It is called mechanical center of the scope.

6. Do the same excercise with elevation knob.

7. Now put the scope on the wooden set up and see through the scope.

8. At 20 yards distance, place a paper and make a dot sign where the the scross hair of the scope is.

9. Now rotate the scope very slowly and you will see that the cross hair will not remain on the dot spot. Now while looking through the scope achieve such a situation where the cross hare would remain on the dot spot during the 360 degrees movement of scope rotation.

10. Now if you have achieved this, it means you have achieved the optical centre of the scope.

11. Install the scope on the gun and do a test fire. If your gun is Diana, the pellet will hit a bit low that the aim point.

12. Please do not adjust the scope knobs to correct this, rather remove the scope and place some plastic films like X ray sheet under the rear mount.

13. Now again install the scope and do 2 test fires. You will see that this time the pellet will hit near the target as compared to the 1st shot.

14. You can place two or three pieces of X ray sheets to bring the pellet hit as near to the target as possible.

15. The remaining minor difference between the pellet hit point and the target may be removed by adjusting the windage and elevation knobs of the scope.

16. If you have successfully done this, you scope will work perfectly.

For any further information mubhaur@yahoo.com

fluffmaster
05-09-2011, 05:28 PM
thanks umair and quoting you:

4. Take the scope in hand and fully tight the windage knob. Now open it to full extent and count the number of rounds the knob takes to get it opened completely.

5. Divide the total rounds with 2 and retight the knob to that extent. This will get you near the optical centre. It is called mechanical center of the scope.

6. Do the same excercise with elevation knob.

7. Now put the scope on the wooden set up and see through the scope.(unquote)

why cant we skip these two steps in that order ? the scope,s centre may be accurate ex manufacture and thus no need of fiddling with the knobs,
I think we should fiddle with them only to the extent of removing the error.for example , I buy a new scope , put it to the test and find that my cross hair doesnt shift on rotating, so I am happy and know my scope is "mechanically" aligned.

if however it does shift, I will then try and fiddle with the knobs only as much , as to remove the error.from my knowledge, if the shifting is on left or right it can be removed by windage and vice versa.fiddling with the knobs by tightening them all the way up and down , left or right isnt a good idea.

I think doing the "rotation" thing can be more standardised by simply taking four readings first with an upright position, then rotating it 90 deg clockwise, again 90 deg clockwise, again 90 deg clockwise and the final 90 deg returns the scope to the initial position. now carefully note the difference the cross hair deviated from the centre and use the appropriate knobs only as much as to remove the deviation.

what do u say?

Umair Bhaur
06-09-2011, 12:12 PM
Dear Sir,

You are very right, there is no need of rotating the turret knobs all the way if your scope is new out of the box and the turrets have never been touched. It is also highly predictable that the new scope will be optically centered and hence there is no need to do any such exercise.

Only the rotating of scope on V blocks should be done to confirm whether the scope is optically centered or not.

If the scope has also been previously used and is not new, then the best way to achieve the optical center is the same as I have already mentioned. Rotating of knobs to full extent for just a few seconds does not cause any harm to springs.

For your information I would mention here that Sportsmatch AOP 55 one piece fully adjustable mount is a great thing. This is made in UK. It is costly. But one you optically zero the scope, and use this mount, there will be no need to shim or to move the turrets even a single click.

The result is best holding capability of POI.

Will this help you?

Umair

fluffmaster
06-09-2011, 03:26 PM
thanks once again umair

u seem to have agreed with one part of my suggestion. my further view is that tightening of the knobs to both extremes is superfluous when u can easily standardise the rotation business to just four right angular positions.,,,,,,
say u see that ur cross hair is aligned perfectly with the target when the scope is vertical. now on rotating 90 deg, u note a slight deviation of say 5 mils left. I say u can remove it there and then by adjusting the windage knob, while still seeing through the scope.and repeat the process for two more right angular positions i.e down and right. that is simple and hassle free yaar.
why do u insist on finding the centre of the clicking knobs , when u just dont need it for this test?

oh btw,,,I am trying to help u there ,,, coz i m personally clear on what I am saying as I have tried it, I suggest u try it.

Umair Bhaur
07-09-2011, 09:50 AM
I still say that you are right but suggest you to give it the last check of 360 degrees rotation during seeing through the scope. This is the finest tuning check recommended by almost all the scope manufacturers.

360 degrees' rotation check appeal to me also as it eliminates even the least misalignment.

HussainAli
07-09-2011, 12:30 PM
Nice Info Borthers !!!!

New things for me to learn !!!

Regards

Mehdi
22-10-2011, 03:23 PM
Dear All

Salams,

My Tasco 3-9x40 scope on a Diana 35 is grouping 6 inches above bulls eye at 35 Yards.The elevation is at its limit on the lower side.At 35 Yards I have to aim 6 inches down to get bulls eye.It is mounted on the regular 11mm default scope rail.

Any one with a remedy? Thanks.

Trajan
22-10-2011, 11:19 PM
Dear All

Salams,

My Tasco 3-9x40 scope on a Diana 35 is grouping 6 inches above bulls eye at 35 Yards.The elevation is at its limit on the lower side.At 35 Yards I have to aim 6 inches down to get bulls eye.It is mounted on the regular 11mm default scope rail.

Any one with a remedy? Thanks.

@ Mehdi: Bro is the scope mounted right? are the rings in complete alignment?

Mehdi
23-10-2011, 12:06 AM
@ Mehdi: Bro is the scope mounted right? are the rings in complete alignment?

Bro Trajan, To my mind they are in alignment,in fact the object lens is a tad lower than the ocular,may be the scope has to sit a bit lower than its present position, it means new rings which are not as high as the present one.

fluffmaster
23-10-2011, 12:10 AM
Dear All

Salams,

My Tasco 3-9x40 scope on a Diana 35 is grouping 6 inches above bulls eye at 35 Yards.The elevation is at its limit on the lower side.At 35 Yards I have to aim 6 inches down to get bulls eye.It is mounted on the regular 11mm default scope rail.

Any one with a remedy? Thanks.

return the elevation adjustment knob to its centre position. use thin cigarette foil for shimming on the rear mount(3 or 4 neatly folded layers). test again and the gun will be firing down. keep doing till it shoots well down of the target. now use elevation adjustment for fine tuning.

Mehdi
23-10-2011, 01:10 PM
Has not helped, when I return the Elevation knob to its center position after placing the foil shims the pellets are way above the target.I guess the mounts need to be replaced with low profile ones.

fluffmaster
23-10-2011, 06:27 PM
Has not helped, when I return the Elevation knob to its center position after placing the foil shims the pellets are way above the target.I guess the mounts need to be replaced with low profile ones.

"low profile mounts" I dont know what does that mean. Ideally go with a single piece mount. I started off with typical 2 piece mounts but abandoned them when faced with problems quite similar to urs

Mehdi
23-10-2011, 09:46 PM
I mean they are not as high as the ones I am using.Single piece mount seems to be the remedy,where from can these be gotten?

fluffmaster
26-10-2011, 09:34 AM
I mean they are not as high as the ones I am using.Single piece mount seems to be the remedy,where from can these be gotten?

got mine from buksh Ilahi on mall road, just a little ahead of the regal chowk. genuine diana single piece mount bought in july for 7200/- then,,,, dont know its price now

hunter468
27-10-2011, 03:46 PM
nice input by members,
let me share 1 more important point
always practice to zero a scope (for a 800 to 1000 fps airgun) at 20 to 25 yards.
by doing this u will get your 1st zero at the said range i.e 20 to 25 yards and automatically u will get second zero at about 40 to 50 yards.

here is a rough drawing to understand it.i hope it will help!

Birdshooter007
27-10-2011, 04:17 PM
nice input by members,
let me share 1 more important point
always practice to zero a scope (for a 800 to 1000 fps airgun) at 20 to 25 yards.
by doing this u will get your 1st zero at the said range i.e 20 to 25 yards and automatically u will get second zero at about 40 to 50 yards.

here is a rough drawing to understand it.i hope it will help!
Great Help,Thanks!

hunter468
27-10-2011, 07:55 PM
Great Help,Thanks!
my pleasure chaudhary brother!

hunter468
27-10-2011, 08:17 PM
here is another one,just check it when scope is zeroed at too close range for a 800 to 100 fps springer.

Birdshooter007
27-10-2011, 08:26 PM
Thanks .

hunter468
27-10-2011, 08:30 PM
similarly if scope is zeroed at a long range lets say 30 yds or plus then 2nd zero will be too close.
and target too close will not b achievable.

Birdshooter007
27-10-2011, 08:35 PM
similarly if scope is zeroed at a long range lets say 30 yds or plus then 2nd zero will be too close.
and target too close will not b achievable.
And if lets say we zero our scope at 10X magnification from 20 yards. Will it be zeroed in the same manner for magnification from 4-16X because during a hunt you need to change magnification

Denovo87
27-10-2011, 09:42 PM
And if lets say we zero our scope at 10X magnification from 20 yards. Will it be zeroed in the same manner for magnification from 4-16X because during a hunt you need to change magnification

Magnification doesn't effect zero (done with the same scope), if its not retaining zero by any chance you put a wrong device on your gun.

Birdshooter007
27-10-2011, 09:47 PM
Magnification doesn't effect zero (done with the same scope), if its not retaining zero by any chance you put a wrong device on your gun.
Thanks, waiting for the device to arrive, already broke one :)

hunter468
27-10-2011, 10:11 PM
And if lets say we zero our scope at 10X magnification from 20 yards. Will it be zeroed in the same manner for magnification from 4-16X because during a hunt you need to change magnification
i will second denovo bro!

fluffmaster
28-10-2011, 02:24 PM
always zero the scope at its max effective range,,,or the range you choose to hunt most often. remember ,,,its more about your shooting skill,,,so first certify your self by grouping tight at the desirable range before shifting the blame to the scope or the gun.
most scopes are error free upto a 100 yards that is parallax error is negligible upto a 100 yds.having done that , let parallax knob (if provided) take care of difference as and when that applies,,,,for use of parallax knob and understanding the error, go back to page 2 of this thread... basically the existense of parallax error would cause the cross hair to blur and moving the parallax knob to reobtain a sharp focus, would have removed it.

personally I have always zeroed my gun first from 20 yds, without fiddling with the knobs as already discussed at length in earlier posts( I just note the deviation from aiming point and see if I am grouping tightly). next I move on to 30 yds ,,,all that happens is that now the group has slightly dispersed but the mpi (mean point of impact) still coincides with the earlier shoot.

next I shoot from 40 yds, (I think thats the ideal effective range for most of the springers)and believe me, I am still grouping tight, not dispersing beyond two inches at the max. Its now that I fiddle with the knobs a little bit and for elevation, first resort to shimming and only then to very slight knob adjustment , if required.

I never aim into the sun, and always keep my cross hair on the bird,s legs as that gives a clear , more defineable aiming point then the rest of the body.

with air king its really a tall order to shoot without a rest, so I have devised an effective technique of shooting from the car,s window. If my bird is on the left side, I just park the car at a distance with a tilted angle and have the bird in my sight with out much ado.

while zeroing at the range, make sure your body is relaxed .( I prefer the lying position). its good to use a couple of sand bags under the rifle as it settles well into the sand and after a while is motionless.take extra time to be precise when aiming as most of us dont "aim through" which is a common cause of poor grouping.

take a good clear view, utilizing the maximum veiwing field of your scope, dont shoot with the viewing circle constricted or shifted.(eye relief)

give very slight pulls of the trigger, infact the best shooters master ignoring the trigger and always have their attention on the target.

haji
29-10-2011, 01:11 PM
thanks a lot hunter468 for the help about this double zero technique!