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View Full Version : Barrel difference b/w Beretta 92FS and Taurus PT92



Asif Jhammat
05-07-2010, 09:53 PM
IS there any difference in barrel between beretta 92FS and PT92?
if we examine the barrels of two we will come to know that PT92's barrel is not in line hard chrome plated?
does it make any difference?
did u feel that?
please comment....

Aquarius
05-07-2010, 10:59 PM
This topic has been discussed before as well.. :)

SPAYPANTHER
05-07-2010, 11:06 PM
This topic has been discussed before as well.. :)
WHERE BRO???

Gilani
05-07-2010, 11:21 PM
Does PT92/99 not have a chrome lined barrel??

SPAYPANTHER
06-07-2010, 12:02 AM
Does PT92/99 not have a chrome lined barrel??
bro you can tell us batter on that

fahadkhalid
06-07-2010, 12:06 AM
i think Gillani sb did try to tell you. It sounds like a sarcastic remark more than a question from him.

Gilani
06-07-2010, 12:27 AM
No fahad sahib, I wont be sarcastic with my brothers. It's more of a surprise call because I always believed that PT99 has a chrome lined barrel. :)

Now coming to the question, I dont know how we can pass a judgment (based on scientific evidence) that which barrel is better? I haven't come across any such data. Anyone who has some solid knowledge on this can share with all of us :)

Zahid Hussain
06-07-2010, 01:57 AM
Salaam,this might not be an appropriate answer to your question but to my knowledge I think the Beretta has a Chrome lined barrel in the case of PT92/99 they have a Chrome Alloy barrel which means they have Chrome mixed into the steel of the barrel unlike being plated on the inner surface.

KageFox
06-07-2010, 02:12 AM
I did not find an authoritative source on this, but by browsing through various "Taurus vs Beretta" threads in a number of forums, I can conclude that:

The Beretta 92 barrel is chrome-lined, while the Taurus PT92 barrel is not. The Beretta barrel is also marginally more accurate.

Other than this, there is no real issue. The Taurus is well-made, and for its price, it gives the Beretta a run for its money. When choosing between the two, IMHO, the minor performance difference does not justify the price gap between them, be it here or in the States...

fahadkhalid
06-07-2010, 11:13 AM
After reading Gillani sb's answer, i hav been googling and blinging the subject for the last one and half hour. not being able to find any scientific data, a majority of gun reviewers have pointed out the fact, that the taurus does not have chrome lining. But now that raises another question in my mind, how do we find out if our guns are chrome lined or not? seniors..

Survivalist
06-07-2010, 01:18 PM
I think follwoing information may be somewhat helpful in this regard. It may also be helpful in understanding process of barrel making. Reference (http://www.sksboards.com/smf/index.php?topic=36794.0).

Since its seems a common topic I am going to make this a general rundown and put in the FAQ section.

Chrome lined barrels are generally thought of as trading accuracy for longevity, and that would be correct generally, but not specifically. In other words just because its chrome lined doesn't mean it wont shoot well, or that if its not chromed it won't last.
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1st off, a primer on how barrels are made. More indepth explanation can be found here - http://www.riflebarrels.com/articles/barrel_making/making_rifle_barrel.htm

A barrel starts out as a chunk of specifically heat treated round bar stock of chrome moly steel. To get the required hardness of 4140 or 4150 they add harder (and denser) elements of Chromium and Molybdenum within the steel as its smelted. 410 or more commonly 416 stainless is also used on a lot of barrels, being relatively the same hardness as 4140 chrome moly steel. From the forging company, usually about 1" in diameter for small arms, but varies depending on what the purpose is. These are purchased in bulk lengths by barrel makers, cut to length and bored under size to whatever spec the caliber is. This is done on a deep bore drill, basically a specialized mill. Then the blank is rifled. To get the bore to the correct diameter, they use reaming, to improve consistency of the bore and produce a smoother finish than the higher speed drill leaves. Its the reaming process that has impact on accuracy on most barrels, some barrels are not reamed at all, just inspected for minimum tolerance and sent out. Some are reamed once, and others are reamed several times depending on the specs they are building to.

Next comes rifling. The oldest method was to actually cut the rifling one groove at a time into a barrel. The most common rifling now is called button rifling. Its made by pushing a football shaped plug with the grooves on it through the bore which pushes the metal of the barrel to form the rifling. Another way is called hammer forging, where they insert a full length plug with the grooves and hammer the outside of the barrel so it forms around the plug. (Read more on it here - Hammer forging) All of these produce a traditional flat groove style rifling. There is another style that is a non edged type instead of the square edged type called polygonal rifling, it produces a smoother bore with flat "lands" that induce the bullet to spin. Glock is one maker who uses this type.

After rifling, some barrel makers will lap the barrel at this point. Armalite claims to lap their barrels before going to chroming to improve consistency of the rifling and bore.

After rifling the chrome layer process is completed. It basically puts a layer of chrome down on the interior of the barrel and welds it to the steel, chrome is roughly twice as hard as 4150 steel. If done correctly it should never separate like chrome does on bumper, its not a separate layer but bonded. They do have to accommodate the extra thickness of the chrome layer, so they slightly oversize bores for barrels intended for chroming.

_

This is why chrome lined barrels tend to not be as accurate. Any time you put a layer of something over an contour, it magnifies it, so any imperfection in the barrel surface is made more so with the extra layer that adds to the surface. There was in the early days of chrome lining process problems keeping the lining thickness uniform as well, though the process has become much more automated and a lot of that has ceased to be an issue.

For normal shooters, chrome lining is not an accuracy killer. The barrel quality control underneath the lining is far more critical than the lining itself. In many cases the lining being an accuracy issue is only one to those like match shooters trying to shave 1/4 MOA off groups.

The main advantage of Chrome is being much harder and impervious than 4150 steel, will hold up to wear a lot longer giving a much longer effective lifespan of a barrel. Its also much easier to clean as powder residue and lead will not work into the pores, like it does in bare steel.

However a chrome lined barrel can still wear and reduce accuracy quickly depending on the use its subjected to. Most wear occurs in the throat, where the most heat and contact friction is, if the wear is sufficient it can cause the bullet be less stable as it travels down the barrel, even chrome lined rifles will have reduced practical accuracy life in full auto use.
Chrome lining also does not protect the crown, which can have a major impact of accuracy of a barrel.

The bottom line is, for any utility or defense rifle there is no reason to not opt for chrome lining where offered. But its not necessary either. A lot of rifles have lived generations without chrome lining, and if you are into accuracy then without question the more accurate barrels are not chrome lined.

More info on general qualities of barrels and manufacture methods.
link to more on barrel steels from Obermeyer barrels

http://www.riflebarrels.com/articles/barrel_making/details_of_accuracy.htm

Survivalist
06-07-2010, 01:25 PM
Summery: (an afterthought to avoid length)

The main advantage of Chrome is being much harder and impervious than 4150 steel, will hold up to wear a lot longer giving a much longer effective lifespan of a barrel. Its also much easier to clean as powder residue and lead will not work into the pores, like it does in bare steel.

However a chrome lined barrel can still wear and reduce accuracy quickly depending on the use its subjected to. Most wear occurs in the throat, where the most heat and contact friction is, if the wear is sufficient it can cause the bullet be less stable as it travels down the barrel, even chrome lined rifles will have reduced practical accuracy life in full auto use.
Chrome lining also does not protect the crown, which can have a major impact of accuracy of a barrel.

The bottom line is, for any utility or defense rifle there is no reason to not opt for chrome lining where offered. But its not necessary either. A lot of rifles have lived generations without chrome lining, and if you are into accuracy then without question the more accurate barrels are not chrome lined.

SPAYPANTHER
06-07-2010, 02:01 PM
After reading Gillani sb's answer, i hav been googling and blinging the subject for the last one and half hour. not being able to find any scientific data, a majority of gun reviewers have pointed out the fact, that the taurus does not have chrome lining. But now that raises another question in my mind, how do we find out if our guns are chrome lined or not? seniors..


its very easy bro a chrome line barrel should be much shine then to steel from inner side...

ACHILLES
06-07-2010, 05:30 PM
SEE what gilani is doing with pt92. chrome or chrome less barrel does not matter.

Abu Al Hawl
06-07-2010, 06:00 PM
Chrome lined barrel actually is better than non chrome, becasue they are easy to clean and does not catch-up coroation, strenght-wise both are equal.

ACHILLES
06-07-2010, 07:31 PM
Chrome lined barrel actually is better than non chrome, becasue they are easy to clean and does not catch-up coroation, strenght-wise both are equal.

But they are less accurate than non-chrome ones.

Abu Al Hawl
06-07-2010, 07:35 PM
yes that is too, because the projectile doesn't get much of better propulsion due to glossy berrel lines

SPAYPANTHER
06-07-2010, 08:00 PM
so both are good , non-chrome for target shooting handguns while chrome for military type handguns

Gilani
07-07-2010, 01:23 AM
Survivalist brother, thanks for sharing this informative article/ link. Frankly, I did not know and did not ever notice that the barrel of my PT99 is not chrome lined. It shines quite a lot actually :D

Survivalist
07-07-2010, 09:45 AM
Survivalist brother, thanks for sharing this informative article/ link. Frankly, I did not know and did not ever notice that the barrel of my PT99 is not chrome lined. It shines quite a lot actually :D

Thanks and welcome sir ji.