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Hamid
25-07-2009, 08:38 PM
Does anyone know about any accident on a firing range (involving civilian shooters) in Pakistan?

Silent killerr
07-08-2009, 03:02 PM
I think it is very rare bcoz qualified people who know about safe handling of guns Join Range.

Zubair
21-08-2009, 12:46 PM
Thanks to ALLAH , have not heard anything at the LRC range I go but often see a lot of 'potential' for these happenings there

MHMalik
21-08-2009, 04:04 PM
Best scenes on shooting ranges that I've seen.. and very common..

1. Scene A: Guy is shooting.. taking all safety precautions. That is.. until his cell phone rings. Just like when it happens when we are driving and the phone rings.. we forget everything in the world.. Coupled with the fact we also like to talk with hand gestures.. guy starts waving his handgun all over the place with one in the chamber.

2. Scene B: Guy shooting... and there is a stoppage. For some reason we always point the gun at someone when clearing it.. or trying to figure out why it jammed..

THese are common malpractices that one should be wary of and should discourage whenever one sees them happen.

Memon
21-08-2009, 09:40 PM
Best scenes on shooting ranges that I've seen.. and very common..

1. Scene A: Guy is shooting.. taking all safety precautions. That is.. until his cell phone rings. Just like when it happens when we are driving and the phone rings.. we forget everything in the world.. Coupled with the fact we also like to talk with hand gestures.. guy starts waving his handgun all over the place with one in the chamber.

2. Scene B: Guy shooting... and there is a stoppage. For some reason we always point the gun at someone when clearing it.. or trying to figure out why it jammed..

THese are common malpractices that one should be wary of and should discourage whenever one sees them happen.


Cell phone ........ nice indication as we all have cell phones and regularly have mind to go for a buzz ..........

Point to be remember.

Regards,

Abu Al Hawl
21-08-2009, 10:30 PM
Best scenes on shooting ranges that I've seen.. and very common..

1. Scene A: Guy is shooting.. taking all safety precautions. That is.. until his cell phone rings. Just like when it happens when we are driving and the phone rings.. we forget everything in the world.. Coupled with the fact we also like to talk with hand gestures.. guy starts waving his handgun all over the place with one in the chamber.

2. Scene B: Guy shooting... and there is a stoppage. For some reason we always point the gun at someone when clearing it.. or trying to figure out why it jammed..

THese are common malpractices that one should be wary of and should discourage whenever one sees them happen.

*WE always point the gun* not me bro never.

MHMalik
24-08-2009, 08:17 PM
Well then we can go shooting together ANYTIME bro! Wish everyone was like you

Hamid
24-08-2009, 11:51 PM
So finally this thread has got valuable input.

Cell phone can be the culprit in such accidents.

Enigmatic Desires
26-08-2009, 04:14 PM
No not the the humble cell phone, the fool behind it

StevenCline
18-09-2009, 01:40 AM
No not the the humble cell phone, the fool behind it

This above, written by Engimatic Desires, is it.

A few months ago we saw TWO accidental shootings in competive shooting at the same range near San Antonio, TX. In the previous 9 years I had heard of no accidents, then two in month at the same range (there are 5 in the San Antonio, TX area)

Situation 1: A man competing in a 3-gun match switched from carbine to handgun. While drawing the handgun he placed his finger onto the trigger and fired a round through his calf.

Situation 2: A man competing in a USPSA match drew his handgun while moving to the place where he wanted to be to shoot. He also placed his finger on the trigger and fired a round through his knee. He had "pinned" the grip safety. He also had to have thumbed off the thumb safety.

As with most "problems" with guns, whether it be with inaccuracy or negligent discharges- it's the jerk on the trigger.

I tell my students that if you tell a gun to go bang, it will try to go bang. Guns do not go bang by themselves.

Denovo87
18-09-2009, 10:07 AM
No not the the humble cell phone, the fool behind it

This above, written by Engimatic Desires, is it.

A few months ago we saw TWO accidental shootings in competive shooting at the same range near San Antonio, TX. In the previous 9 years I had heard of no accidents, then two in month at the same range (there are 5 in the San Antonio, TX area)

Situation 1: A man competing in a 3-gun match switched from carbine to handgun. While drawing the handgun he placed his finger onto the trigger and fired a round through his calf.

Situation 2: A man competing in a USPSA match drew his handgun while moving to the place where he wanted to be to shoot. He also placed his finger on the trigger and fired a round through his knee. He had "pinned" the grip safety. He also had to have thumbed off the thumb safety.

As with most "problems" with guns, whether it be with inaccuracy or negligent discharges- it's the jerk on the trigger.

I tell my students that if you tell a gun to go bang, it will try to go bang. Guns do not go bang by themselves.


To me both incidents seem result of AFTER MARKET PERFORMANCE PARTS which competitors use to smoothen their trigger pull etc. And I am sure when changing the parts most of the shooters donot change their previous gun handling habit.

StevenCline
18-09-2009, 11:47 PM
No not the the humble cell phone, the fool behind it

This above, written by Engimatic Desires, is it.

A few months ago we saw TWO accidental shootings in competive shooting at the same range near San Antonio, TX. In the previous 9 years I had heard of no accidents, then two in month at the same range (there are 5 in the San Antonio, TX area)

Situation 1: A man competing in a 3-gun match switched from carbine to handgun. While drawing the handgun he placed his finger onto the trigger and fired a round through his calf.

Situation 2: A man competing in a USPSA match drew his handgun while moving to the place where he wanted to be to shoot. He also placed his finger on the trigger and fired a round through his knee. He had "pinned" the grip safety. He also had to have thumbed off the thumb safety.

As with most "problems" with guns, whether it be with inaccuracy or negligent discharges- it's the jerk on the trigger.

I tell my students that if you tell a gun to go bang, it will try to go bang. Guns do not go bang by themselves.


To me both incidents seem result of AFTER MARKET PERFORMANCE PARTS which competitors use to smoothen their trigger pull etc. And I am sure when changing the parts most of the shooters donot change their previous gun handling habit.

I humbly submit that if this where to be true then their previous gun handling habits were wrong.

I understand that they were competitive shooters can distract and lead one to believe it was the "race" equipment, the "shoot faster" guns, but please consider:

People too frequently wish to blame the machine or parts instead of the shooter. These two experienced shooters did what they were not supposed to do:

They placed their finger on the trigger when they were not ready to shoot.

When you place your finger on the trigger you are telling the gun to go bang.

My Kimber's trigger has been worked on and requires only 2.5 lbs of pressure to fire it. I've never Negligently Discharged the gun on the draw because I never put my finger on the trigger on the draw.

If the two shooters hadn't placed their finger on the trigger (the bad habit, the unsafe habit) when they weren't ready to shoot, they wouldn't have shot when they were unready. It wouldn't have mattered if it were a 2.5 lb trigger or 9.5 lb trigger. No pressure on the trigger is no pressure on the trigger.


caveat: I think pinning the grip safety on a gun is stupid, mechanical malfunctions and poor gun-smithing could produce an accidental discahrge, but that wasn't the case in the two shootings we had here.

Enigmatic Desires
19-09-2009, 03:14 AM
The thing is Steve.. I noticed that when ever people handle guns.. (myself included) whether cleaning shooting or just plain handling it.. the finger just naturally manages to sneak its way into the trigger guard..

Its not Just me. i've noticed it with just bout most of the people who handle firearms.. the trigger finger has to be 'weaned' off the trigger.

I at least have to make a conscious effort to keep it away til I want to shoot.

StevenCline
19-09-2009, 03:25 AM
The thing is Steve.. I noticed that when ever people handle guns.. (myself included) whether cleaning shooting or just plain handling it.. the finger just naturally manages to sneak its way into the trigger guard..

Its not Just me. i've noticed it with just bout most of the people who handle firearms.. the trigger finger has to be 'weaned' off the trigger.

I at least have to make a conscious effort to keep it away til I want to shoot.

I have seen people do this as well.

If the gun goes bang, I believe it to be the fault of person who put the finger on the trigger, not the gun.

Have we miscommunicated in some way?

XMen
19-09-2009, 02:15 PM
Very informative and mind opening i also have faced the same problem with my self while shooting

PUNJTANI5
19-06-2010, 04:45 PM
one of my ex subbordinates shot his own foot off while he was trying 2 hold the gun in his finger using the trigger . it was 10 yrs ago


a few months ago another ediot shot his own foot while on a hunting trip with a shotgun

last year a cousin of my another subbordinate got himsefl killed with his own shot gun due to hair trigger

inna lillah wa inn illaihe rajioon