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View Full Version : Gaining confidence in your weapon.



AMP11692
30-01-2013, 05:29 AM
If someone were to have little to no access to a firing range or someones far away farm.
How would he/she practice the firearm and gain confidence in it, which is a responsibly of any gun owner who intends to use his weapon for a situation that may call for it.

Ahnab
30-01-2013, 03:40 PM
IMHO, owning a firearm (especially for SD) and not practicing using it is like owning a car but never driving it. I admit there are very few shooting ranges where gun enthusiasts can go. However, do try to get some trigger time on your weapon (in a legal manner). If access to a range or a private, isolated tract of land is impossible, then I really can't see any other proper way of getting better acquainted with your gun.

Hamid
30-01-2013, 04:05 PM
Practice with snap caps in your room. Practice drawing the weapon from your holster. You can practice various scenarios of home defence with your weapon.

Check twice that there is no ammo in the gun or in the room you intend to practice in.

sadatpk
30-01-2013, 04:29 PM
Practice with snap caps in your room. Practice drawing the weapon from your holster. You can practice various scenarios of home defence with your weapon.

Check twice that there is no ammo in the gun or in the room you intend to practice in.
accessive dry firing may cause damage to fire pin,pls try to avoid it max if possible

tatur1
30-01-2013, 05:03 PM
use of a valid snapcap causes no damage to firing pin... Also I dont think using a snapcap or even dry firing at home will give you any experience about actually using your weapon... One thing that YOU MUST understand about your gun is its recoil and how you handle it... I have had a lot of trouble with flinch and recoil (lets admit it, everybody has!) and you will not get over it unless you actually fire your weapon enough.

It might be expensive, but if you want a handgun for SD, and you want to use it in SD cases (unless you want to literally offer your gun as a gift to bad guys) you really should afford ammo and frequent trips to shooting range. Simply dry firing and practically drawing your weapon in room is not enough.

I recommend Nawaz bhai at ASCC, he is retired from Navy and very very cooperative. He has taught me a lot, target shooting, tactical shooting and even some self defense moves.... I have a compulsion that I have business to take care of so I can't just spare time to go there more often and I really regret what I am missing...

Dragg3r
30-01-2013, 06:02 PM
use of a valid snapcap causes no damage to firing pin... Also I dont think using a snapcap or even dry firing at home will give you any experience about actually using your weapon... One thing that YOU MUST understand about your gun is its recoil and how you handle it... I have had a lot of trouble with flinch and recoil (lets admit it, everybody has!) and you will not get over it unless you actually fire your weapon enough.

It might be expensive, but if you want a handgun for SD, and you want to use it in SD cases (unless you want to literally offer your gun as a gift to bad guys) you really should afford ammo and frequent trips to shooting range. Simply dry firing and practically drawing your weapon in room is not enough.

I recommend Nawaz bhai at ASCC, he is retired from Navy and very very cooperative. He has taught me a lot, target shooting, tactical shooting and even some self defense moves.... I have a compulsion that I have business to take care of so I can't just spare time to go there more often and I really regret what I am missing...

+1

Nawaz bhai at ASCC will be able to help you out alot and no doubt he is highly cooperative, so it would be best for you AMP11692 to visit ASCC and start practicing and gain self confidence in your weapon.

joney
30-01-2013, 08:47 PM
AMP Brother,

I hope you've got the answer of your question.

let me share my experience here.

Dry firing (with snap cap offcourse) will only help you to judge the weight of trigger. How your gun really act when you fire (Gun recoil, your hands movement) can only be judged with real shooting.

that's what i felt in my first shooting session. Try to find some friend out of town or some village ( if you do not have access in shooting range). it will be really helpful for you as well as will increase your confidence for shooting.

Happy and safe shooting.

AMP11692
30-01-2013, 09:06 PM
Thank you all very much, Yes you guys did help. I will try to find someone with similar needs and go to a farm or if nothing else. Make my way to the range.

Trigger_happy78
31-01-2013, 11:42 AM
Bro like other members said that dry firing is a great way to gain confidence in your weapon. Most of the modern firearms of today are safe to dry fire. You can pretend different scenarios, without firing a single shot. I do it often. But as other members said that try firing some live rounds too to get the feel of the gun and how it recoils.....